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View Full Version : Diesel Pick-up: New or Used?



cco45acp
09-24-2011, 06:28 PM
Considering getting a diesel crew cab Chevy Silverado P/U. Would like to get WT opinions on the best value. Here are the options:

New - 2011 work truck for $42K

Used -2005 LT for $26K

Will use it as farm truck, daily commuter (35miles round trip), and also to load up camping gear and take long trips (1500 - 2500 round trips)

I can afford either one but definitely could use the 16k for other things.

Again I looking for what would be the best value for the money.

Thanks

blackballed
09-24-2011, 06:32 PM
Used.

:finger::finger:

Craig R
09-24-2011, 06:52 PM
I'd say used too. The cost you'll pay at the dealership for a new diesel over a gas is enormous, that doesn't typically apply when buying used, at least not to that extent. When you're talking diesels that typically last a lot longer used imo would be the way to go.

William Carter
09-24-2011, 09:42 PM
The 2 main down sides for deisel are 1-they can be hard to start in cold climates. 2-lately deisel has been higher than regular gas. Still there are disadvantages with every thing else 2. Hopefully American car/trucks are being made better lately than a few years back. I say American, but really the parts like tranny usually are made in another country.

KaiserJeep
09-27-2011, 08:11 AM
The other downside to diesel is fuel availability. Only 1 in 5 "gas stations" sell diesel fuel in the USA. That's an improvement, as it used to be 1 in 8 years ago. This means nothing in daily driver use where you know the area but is a major inconvenience when camping unless you are the peronality type to plan your trip in detail including the fuel stops, and carry either a computer or a GPS with a database of gas stations.

Perhaps most importantly, I did not hear you state any reason to own a diesel. Do you frequently tow a heavy load for long distances? Do you seldom have to park in extreme cold?

texvet
09-27-2011, 02:37 PM
If you are going to use it as a farm truck, check with your accountant to see if you can write it off. Every so often, the IRS will let you depreciate a new truck in one year, but that only counts for a new truck. On our farm, we only buy used. My wife bought a 2004 F250 with a 6.0 powerstroke for $6K on ebay and it has been a great truck.
For the 16K difference, you could buy the farm truck and a more fuel efficient car as a daily driver.
I drive a VW Jetta TDI ( 43 MPG) vs my 2000 F350 with a 7.3 Powerstoke (13.5 MPG).

Jons999
09-28-2011, 09:36 AM
Personally i would look at something used that is 1-2 years old. That way you save several thousands of dollars off the cost of the new truck, but if the used one is only a couple years old it is still under warrenty for a little while. Diesels can be extremely expensive to fix if the injection pump or the injectors take a crap.

chad newton
09-28-2011, 10:02 AM
Look into a dodge. Cummins is by far the best diesel out there with durability in concern. Plus the price is cheap, just make sure you get a pre smog equipment. 07 and older.

austin
09-28-2011, 10:33 AM
I had diesels for 20+ years. Back then, it made sense to go with them. Given the price differentials on the motor and the price of diesel, and the high quality of today's gas motors, you cannot justify a diesel.

I'd get a gas truck. You can get some good deals on new ones.

Yooper75
09-28-2011, 11:50 AM
Pick up a lightly used 2010-2011 lease return with low miles and plenty of factory warranty left. Just an FYI the Duramax likes to eat injector like I like potato chips which is why we don't keep tater chips in the house if you get my drift. A diesel is either a love or hate it kind of thing I love my F350 and will not own another gasser if my life depended on it plus it pisses off the hippy masses that live around me which gives me great satisfaction as I drive through the three foot snow bank at the end our alley and they can't get out of their drive way with their econobox.

cco45acp
09-28-2011, 02:40 PM
The other downside to diesel is fuel availability. Only 1 in 5 "gas stations" sell diesel fuel in the USA. That's an improvement, as it used to be 1 in 8 years ago. This means nothing in daily driver use where you know the area but is a major inconvenience when camping unless you are the peronality type to plan your trip in detail including the fuel stops, and carry either a computer or a GPS with a database of gas stations.

Perhaps most importantly, I did not hear you state any reason to own a diesel. Do you frequently tow a heavy load for long distances? Do you seldom have to park in extreme cold?

Thanks to all the reply. Diesel is probably more a want than need. Will tow heavy loads short distances and also plan to use it for long distance camping trips where I want to carry a lot of gear to set up a "base camp" for multi day back packing trips. Towing weight (10K lbs or more) requires 3/4t truck. I think the diesel will be cheaper to drive the long distances for camping.

Can't find many/any trucks that are 2-3 years old. Those that I do find seem to have a higher asking price that a new work truck.

cco45acp
01-20-2012, 08:24 AM
Opinions on the 2012 Dodge Ram 2500 diesels? Do you have to put urea in them like the Chevy's?

Gun Mutt
01-20-2012, 09:12 AM
Opinions on the 2012 Dodge Ram 2500 diesels? Do you have to put urea in them like the Chevy's?
Love our 2500's...remote start with a diesel rocks. No additives necessary at this time. They still have a self cleaning emissions particulate filter in 2012. The "truck guy" at our dealership says to look for them in 2013. As I always do when Chrysler/Jeep/Dodge/Ram comes up, I'll extend the offer for you to pm me & I'll tell you all the true figures on anything in our lineup.

choirboy
01-20-2012, 11:51 AM
I have a '96 Dodge dually with the Cummins. On the highway it will get 19MPG without a trailer. It sucks fuel short hopping. We have three full size trucks and a Ford Explorer. I have a bad back and the Dodge is the easiest on my carcass. It is a mofo to park in any urban area.

The liability insurance is almost twice that of my F150. Some companies that I called for quotes will not insure what they deem to be a commercial vehicle. Last rejection was AARP The Hartford (I think).

I am getting heavy rust under the doors and on the front fenders. I just never had the ambition to wax a vehicle that would be in cow shit the next day.

I love the Dodge and will run it until it or me die.

Choirboy

BillyOblivion
01-20-2012, 08:50 PM
Considering getting a diesel crew cab Chevy Silverado P/U. Would like to get WT opinions on the best value. Here are the options:

New - 2011 work truck for $42K
Used -2005 LT for $26K
Will use it as farm truck, daily commuter (35miles round trip), and also to load up camping gear and take long trips (1500 - 2500 round trips)
I can afford either one but definitely could use the 16k for other things.
Again I looking for what would be the best value for the money.
Thanks

I'd suggest you get the 2005, and spend about 4-5k on a fuel efficient beater for that 35 mile commute. The LT will get, what, about 18 miles to the gallon? That's roughly 30 a week on gas. If you can halve that and only drive the PU when the weather's crap or you need to haul stuff, then the truck with last longer, you have some redundancy if there's a problem with either vehicle and have extra money for guns, training or vacation.

dbaierl
01-20-2012, 09:13 PM
My dad just bought a 01 3/4 ton dodge 6 speed that has 140k on it for 7500. It's an upgrade from his 98 1ton that has 319,000 miles on it.
Cummins are very durable. The only reason he's changing trucks is cosmetic. The 98 is getting pretty ruff around the edges with all the salt they use around here. Still runs good though.

mooseman100
01-20-2012, 09:23 PM
2002 chevy 2500 duramax and of course the allison transmission. I have not chipped it or tweaked the torque converter. Still pretty much stock. I get 19 mpg around town and I got 22 on long drive to TX last year cruising at avg 75 mph. I have just shy of 140,000 on it. Still same injectors. The chip that makes the odometer work is sporatic at best from around 125,000.
My neighbor has a dodge 3/4 ton, I believe he can haul more weight than I can, but for sure my chevy is way more comfortable. Second chevy diesel I have owned.

True that diesel is not found as reaidly as gas, so pay attention on long trips away from your AO. Also keep a old leather glove for when you fill up, gas is bad on youir hand, diesel takes a while to wash off.

chad newton
01-20-2012, 10:00 PM
If you go dodge, get a pre emissions truck 06 and older. Duramax is good 06 and older. Stay away from ford especially 6 liter models. I don't care what anybody on here says, take my advice on that. We have five of them. Stickshift or manual is all about preference. If you want a tranny to last 500,000 get a manual. If you don't plan on keeping the truck more then 100,000 then automatic will be ok. The dodge transmissions are ok, alison on the Chevys is supposedly(seen problems with those to) better. I drive big rigs alot for work, so the last thing I want to do when I leave is shift gears. If you have more questions on specific years I can give you more answers. Personally I would go 06 in either dodge or chevy 4x4 longbed auto matic 3/4 ton. color: grey or silver.:)

chad newton
01-20-2012, 10:06 PM
2002 chevy 2500 duramax and of course the allison transmission. I have not chipped it or tweaked the torque converter. Still pretty much stock. I get 19 mpg around town and I got 22 on long drive to TX last year cruising at avg 75 mph. I have just shy of 140,000 on it. Still same injectors. The chip that makes the odometer work is sporatic at best from around 125,000.
My neighbor has a dodge 3/4 ton, I believe he can haul more weight than I can, but for sure my chevy is way more comfortable. Second chevy diesel I have owned.

True that diesel is not found as reaidly as gas, so pay attention on long trips away from your AO. Also keep a old leather glove for when you fill up, gas is bad on youir hand, diesel takes a while to wash off.

That's funny on fuel milage, my cummins gets 16. There is a sales guy that comes around with an 04 duramax and gets 26. It's not bullshit, I saw his fuel records because I didn't believe him. The funniest part was the truck almost had 300,000 on it. Talk about a good machine, said it had never been in the shop other then services.

cco45acp
01-21-2012, 09:12 PM
Appreciate all the good input. Still looking into the options. Had a friend who had a Dodge 2007 diesel and traded it because short trips were screwing up the injectors and emissions stuff say that all the big three had problems from 2007 until late 2010 with the new emissions system diesels. He said he heard that after about 2010.5 they figured it out and pretty well had it fixed.

Anyone else heard this?

chad newton
01-21-2012, 11:10 PM
Appreciate all the good input. Still looking into the options. Had a friend who had a Dodge 2007 diesel and traded it because short trips were screwing up the injectors and emissions stuff say that all the big three had problems from 2007 until late 2010 with the new emissions system diesels. He said he heard that after about 2010.5 they figured it out and pretty well had it fixed.

Anyone else heard this?
Check fuel milage with the newer ones, they are horrible. I would stay away from them for now, all the emission filters will ware out. I have been pricing the kits for our fleet of bigrigs and they arnt cheap. The cheapest 13,000 installed(lower hp motors) 30,000(high hp motors). So keep that in mind.

cco45acp
01-23-2012, 07:05 AM
Check fuel milage with the newer ones, they are horrible. I would stay away from them for now, all the emission filters will ware out. I have been pricing the kits for our fleet of bigrigs and they arnt cheap. The cheapest 13,000 installed(lower hp motors) 30,000(high hp motors). So keep that in mind.


Have you heard any mileage figures for the new ones? Some of what I've points to 15-20 MPG highway but those might be puff pieces.

choirboy
01-23-2012, 07:17 AM
Not directly on point:

I love old diesels. My oldest farm tractor is a Ford that is a '59 or a '61 depending on which dealer to believe. This thing has had a bearing knock for at least 10 years and simply will not die.

Choirboy

tomsdaname
01-23-2012, 07:37 AM
If i were to tell you that the Ford Ranger has evolved into the most dependable Ford truck you could buy,,,,you probably wouldnt believe me would you...Too bad it's true......

116Echo
02-12-2012, 02:52 PM
My 2006 Dodge w/ Cummins engine gets 20mpg on the highway, even on winter-blend fuel. City mileage suffers during the cold months, but it's in the mid-upper teens in the summer. BTW, buy used.

jeffgbook
02-12-2012, 03:28 PM
Appreciate all the good input. Still looking into the options.

You still looking?

I'm selling my 2001 F-250 7.3L (bulletproof) with only 95k

cco45acp
02-12-2012, 06:52 PM
You still looking?

I'm selling my 2001 F-250 7.3L (bulletproof) with only 95k

OP here. I sent you a PM. Sorry, asked about the mileage and you've good it posted already:footinmouth:

back2basics
02-12-2012, 08:40 PM
cummins diesels are hard to beat. The 7.3L Fords are supposed to be really nice to. I have a friend who makes biodiesel for his dodge, bought a 5k setup and claims he makes it for .73 cents a gallon. Actually runs cleaner then ff diesel that we run. I am really considering getting into this when funds allow, just have to find a good source of veg oil. The chains wont give it up but if you can find local restaurants and sign a contract saying you wont leave them hanging (as in quit showing up to emply their tank) they will usually give it up for free.
Just thought that was another good selling point for diesels because they were originall designed to run on straight veg (peanut) oil and you have options in case prices get too high. Just make sure you run a tank of regular diesel through it before you take it in to the dealership for service (if you buy new it might affect warranty.)

back2basics
02-12-2012, 08:43 PM
oh so you basically just have to add lye and methanol to the oil. Then you run water through it to clean out inpurities and boom you have biodiesel. You actually gain some performance and it runs cleaner. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LR1M7ThM-tE

cco45acp
02-12-2012, 09:39 PM
oh so you basically just have to add lye and methanol to the oil. Then you run water through it to clean out inpurities and boom you have biodiesel. You actually gain some performance and it runs cleaner. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LR1M7ThM-tE

I've got a friend at church who runs a VW TDI on biodiesel that he "cooks" in his basement. I've looked into the equipment to turn soybeans into biodiesel - about 5-7 G but process seems pretty straight forward.

back2basics
02-12-2012, 11:27 PM
Nice, the only drawback for me was having to get it from restaurants so you are basically limited to that. Would be interesting to find out what crop produces the most per space of plant, is easy to grow, and how easy it is to extract from the plant. I mean If I could have a half acre of planted soybeans and it could run all my vehicles and generator I would into it. Any info you can get about how exactly he takes a soybean and turns it into veg oil would be greatly appreciated.

jeffgbook
02-13-2012, 07:23 AM
Hey cco I replied to your pm

cco45acp
02-13-2012, 09:12 AM
Nice, the only drawback for me was having to get it from restaurants so you are basically limited to that. Would be interesting to find out what crop produces the most per space of plant, is easy to grow, and how easy it is to extract from the plant. I mean If I could have a half acre of planted soybeans and it could run all my vehicles and generator I would into it. Any info you can get about how exactly he takes a soybean and turns it into veg oil would be greatly appreciated.

I'm not an expert by any means but a little Google Fu indicated that an acre of soybeans can be turned into 63 gallons of biodiesel (other chemicals are necessary for the process). If you drive 15000 miles per year in a 15mpg diesel pick-up, you'd need 16 acres at a yield of 42 bushels an acre.

A couple of websites:

http://www.make-biodiesel.org/

http://www.turnerbiodiesel.com/

My read is that it isn't economical at current prices versus diesel at the pump. Also I've heard the biodiesel gums up the emissions system gear in diesels made in the last four or five years.

Where a set-up like this might be worthwhile is if you lived in a rural area and fuel prices went way up you could take farmers seed crops in and process them for a fee or percent. I bet though there are so many taxes and regulations involved in this it would basically keep an average guy from doing it legally. Then again I've not done a lot of research and this is just conjecture.

cco45acp
02-13-2012, 09:13 AM
Hey cco I replied to your pm


Got it jeffgbook. Thanks.

jeffgbook
02-14-2012, 10:49 AM
Hey cco,

I sent you a pm AGAIN...

wweverett
02-16-2012, 11:04 AM
I only buy new diesels, when i trade one in it has started showing me problems. So if you bu used you could get one of these, i have a 2011 4x4 crew lb ctd i get about 13.5 mpg. The dpf and the egr is a problem if you are using it for a grocery getter.....but nothing beats a diesel for pulling power.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

JLB
04-20-2012, 06:21 AM
I don't know how concerned you are with comfort but you could get a very reliable 'tractor' of a vehicle by buying an old Dodge Ram with the old mechanical no-nonsense 5.9L Cummins engine. These engines also have little-to-none of the emissions junk you'd otherwise have to remove to improve mileage and reliability.

Swampy
07-02-2012, 10:41 PM
I own a 2005 Chevy 2500 HD 4x4 with the Duramax and the 5 speed Allison transmission. I have just over 100,000 miles on it. No issues so far. I change the fluids and filters on a regular basis. I put a new set of tires on last year and just did the front brakes and replaced the rotors. So far everything is stock except the large free flow exhaust. I may put another tranny cooler on it this summer but thats about it. If I keep my foot out of it I get around 18mpg, 20-21 on the highway. My only regrets is I didn't find an 06 or 07 when I was looking. You can't go wrong with a nice Duramax if you are looking for a Diesel with an auto tranny. I use mine for commuting to work, going to the range, and hauling stuff up to the cabin. I really should buy a nice old beater car for back and forth to work like another poster suggested for you. I probably only need a truck about 25% of the time. If all works out I will also have a low mileage 93 Dodge 4x4 with a 5 speed later this year or early next year. ( I can't resist as it's a gem of a truck!)If a dodge is your thing, go with a stick and the old 5.9 cummins. Those are great trucks as well.

RayMich
07-02-2012, 11:36 PM
Unless you are planning to do a lot of long distance heavy hauling, I would recommend to get a gasoline engine truck. The price differential for the diesel package and the more expensive diesel fuel does not make the diesel truck cost effective otherwise.

If you still want a diesel truck, if you can help it, look for a 2006 or a 2007 Classic body style Chevy or GMC with the LBZ Duramax Diesel. They fixed all the injector and overheating problems experienced with the 2001 thru 2005 engines and they don't have the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) or the the new Urea diesel exhaust fluid system required for the 2007 and newer model years' emission systems.

I've been driving a 2006 GMC 3/4 Ton LBZ Duramax with the Allison 6-speed transmission since December 2005 and have not had a lick of problems. This is currently my every day ride. I also have never had any problems finding fuel, but I generally stick to buying fuel at truck stops. This has been the most trouble free vehicle I have ever owned.

Fords have had a lot of problems with their Powerstroke diesel engines. The Dodge trucks come with the bullet-proof Cummins Diesel engine, but the problem is they are wrapped in a Dodge body. 'Nuff said.

If you are buying a used truck, get a Car FAX report and better yet, get a warranty history report along with the Car FAX. A lot of pre 2006 trucks had serious injector and overheating problems. In fact, I would not touch any 2001 thru 2003 Duramax with the LB7 engine, they are pretty much guaranteed to have injector problems. 2004 and 2005 trucks have a history of overheating when hauling heavy loads. As I stated above, I would look for a 2006 or early 2007 LBZ diesel engine.

cco45acp
07-03-2012, 07:27 AM
Thanks Ray. Some thorough advice. Will probably resume my search soon.

joseywales76
07-22-2012, 06:07 PM
99 to 2003.5 ford 7.3 powerstroke 6 speeds are the best diesels ever made.
94 to 97 7.3 powerstroke 5 speed have weaker trans[ZF} but still good if you dont beat on them.
89ish to 96ish dodge with 5 speed (NV4500) good 12 v motors, trans need 5th gear fixed then your good to go. rest of truck sucks.
96ish to 2005ish dodge with 6 speed (nv5600) are good trans, 24 v motor, but if motor needs work pullout your wallet.

best old diesel is the 6.9 in ford trucks you want the newest you can get, old block will crack around block heater.

6.5 GM = junk
2003.5 to 2008ish ford 6.0 powerstroke = junk
6.2 GM ok if you dont rag on it.

biggest thing, is take your time and cherry pick nice 1 owner ride, my brother picked up nice 2003 7.3 6speed 4x4 from a lady who used to pull a small two horse trailer with it.