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Gabriel Suarez
06-21-2011, 03:27 PM
The material below was taken from a journal on the effects of aging. Many of you fit in this category of "seasoned warriors".

If you are a gunman, as warriors of the 21st century all are, the above facts creates even more challenges. These challenges have been attacked with all manner of creative sighting issues, but the only real answer that bypasses all of the issues facing the aging gunman is the TSD Combat Systems Red Dot installation.

Yeah, I am marketing this, but marketing the solution to you is a hell of alot better than having you sit on the bench like some old guy that can't shoot, crying like a little girl because you can't see your sights any more.

Problem...solution...end of story.

Next?



In middle age, the lens of the eye becomes less flexible and less able to thicken, and thus less able to focus on nearby objects, a condition called presbyopia. Reading glasses, or bifocal lenses, can help compensate for this problem.

In old age, changes to the sclera (the white of the eyes) include yellowing or browning due to many years of exposure to ultraviolet light, wind, and dust; random splotches of pigment (more common in people with a dark complexion); and a bluish hue due to increased transparency of the sclera.

The number of mucous cells in the conjunctiva may decrease with age. Tear production may also decrease with age, so that fewer tears are available to keep the surface of the eye moist. Both of these changes explain why older people are more likely to have dry eyes.

The muscles that work to regulate the size of the pupils weaken with age. The pupils become smaller, react more sluggishly to light, and dilate more slowly in the dark. Therefore, people older than 60 may find that objects are not as bright, that they are dazzled initially when going outdoors (or when facing oncoming cars during night driving), that they have difficulty going from a brightly lit environment to a darker one, or changing visual focus from near to far, or vise-versa. These changes may be particularly bothersome when combined with the effects of a cataract.

Other changes in eye function also occur as people age. The sharpness of vision (acuity) is reduced despite use of the best glasses, especially in people who have a cataract, macular degeneration, or advanced glaucoma. The amount of light that reaches the back of the retina is reduced, increasing the need for brighter illumination and for greater contrast between objects and the background. Older people may also see increased numbers of floating black spots (floaters). Floaters usually do not significantly interfere with vision.

Tank
06-21-2011, 04:14 PM
At 62, I've got all of those to some degree.

Sometimes I've had to lay off shooting for periods of time, and when I get back, my vision and accuracy have decreased. But as I get back to shooting regularly, my vision and accuracy start to improve. I don't know what to attribute this to besides practice, and that maybe it improves some of the problems talked about in the article (use it or lose it, if you will).

I'm not as good a shot as I was when I was younger, but I still ain't too bad. I have learned to appreciate the help that modern optics offer to help maintain my accuracy; that's why I have a variety of them on several of the weapons I have. I have red dots on a couple of my handguns and I can testify that they really do help these old eyes with target acquisition speed.

skip44
06-22-2011, 04:44 PM
I'm pushing 67. My close up focus has been only slightly compromised for the last 20 years, but I've noticed, lately, that all of the other age related issues are starting to catch up. The pollen this spring has also really affected my eyes, and I'm left handed and right eye dominate. So, my LCP has a red dot and I like it. That being said, I will happily take some of the inconveniences of age and head back to the South West for the fall and winter where I can carry, shoot and off road again.Allan

Fulanito
06-22-2011, 05:18 PM
Crying like a girl, changing tampon now, my breasts are sensitive and my tummy hurts.... I have resisted all attempts of others to MAKE me use the goggles. Finally I gave in. Got reading glasses and oh yeah, also the F/O front site. Next step is the TSD. Damn my eyes!! Aparently Im selfdestructing.

Fulanito
06-22-2011, 06:00 PM
It is your DUTY to do so bro. Much like it was for me to point out bad brakes or burned transmission fluid to a customer. Then you offer a solution. The customer gets good advice/service that fills a need and we earn a profit from providing for the need. Perfectly Correct and Expected for us to Market our offerings to persons whom we can help make their lives easier/better and safer.

And this is why Im in love with the capitalistic way of life. You go Gabe! Super practical, wonderfully efficient, mega direct. I offer a high grade security service for only a certain clientele of high net worth. Every now and then someone will ask me "aren't you ever ashamed of how much you make from these people?" I always say "No, because thats my market, they need what I provide, they pay for descretion and worldwide deployability on a moments notice...no questions asked". If you offer the market something special, you need to charge for it. It creates competition. In the end, we get a better world, lower prices, superior products. Thats called progress.

And if someone doesnt like it, they can stay on the porch and change their tampons with the rest of the gals.

JDoza
06-22-2011, 06:25 PM
I believe there is a portion of today's society that isn't happy unless they have an excuse for failing after little or no real effort. They find it easier to wallow in self-pity, than to adapt and succeed. Keep the innovations coming Mr. Suarez.

mudgunner49
06-28-2011, 07:40 AM
While not as old as some, I do have a relatively unique situation. On 30 November 2009 I suffered a spontaneous and massive retinal tear in my right (dominant) eye which has thus far necessitated 6 separate surgeries to (partially) repair. I am backup to about 20/60 in that eye but have been shooting throughout with my left eye in spite of my right-handedness - this has given me a new appreciation for the issues facing the cross-dominant shooter.

To top all of this off I had to shoot my Army Personal Weapons Tests in the fall of 2010 and shot 3rd highest score on rifle (shooting left-handed) and highest score on pistol (shooting right-handed). The only thing stopping me from RMR'ing a pistol is the fact that I would then be shooting Open class in IPSC.

I do have an extra G34 sitting around however...

Winchester67
07-28-2011, 05:25 AM
This post deserves a bump. I am 46 and all my life I have enjoyed sharp vision. In a clear case of not understanding what you have, I now have to hold magazines out a little further to read. A strong squint still allows me to shoot, but a pair of Wal Mart glasses really bring the front sight back into focus. I am ready to admit I am getting older, and the red dot solves the problem. Cheating? Yes, just like I require for a gunfight!

skeeter
07-28-2011, 07:15 AM
Don't underestimate the value or effectiveness of procedures like LASIK surgery. After I had mine, accuracy & target acquisition were vastly improved.

jmac_52
07-28-2011, 08:14 AM
Don't underestimate the value or effectiveness of procedures like LASIK surgery. After I had mine, accuracy & target acquisition were vastly improved.

I've had thyroid problems that affected my eyesight a number of years ago, and was told that no surgery would correct my problems. It's disappointing, but I've learned to deal with it to a degree. The red dot solution is the only one I can see for further improvement in my sighting.

UrbanTiger74
07-28-2011, 09:33 AM
Don't underestimate the value or effectiveness of procedures like LASIK surgery. After I had mine, accuracy & target acquisition were vastly improved.

I have an astigmatism in my right eye due years of driving at night(blurry at long distances). It's not bad, but definitely noticeable when I compare sight clarity between my right and left eye. I'll prolly have LASIK done down the line.
100 yards and further I have a hard time keeping tight groups with irons(especially rear peep sight irons). But with red dots or such, it's literally day and night.
I still make an effort to stay in touch with irons because when batteries run out of juice or none are available, that's all you have left.
Like a famous warrior/philosopher said "Water can flow or it can crash. Be water my friend."

Puddle
07-28-2011, 11:53 AM
sit on the bench like some old guy that can't shoot, crying like a little girl because you can't see your sights any more.

Screw that. 3 months ago I had the lazik tap dance done on my eyeballs. Now I no longer need to carry that little hanky :biglaugh:

Pict
07-28-2011, 12:41 PM
At 46 my arms are getting too short to read. It still remains what's to be seen when I get back to the US in October and start shooting regularly again. I have though about the Lasik surgery but would like to hear from more shooters as to how it affected them. I'm at the point now where I can't read with my glasses on but can't see the people I'm speaking to with them off. The net effect is that I clearly expound the Word of God to very blurry people.

A RDS on my AK is a serious consideration.

Mac

lostone1413
07-28-2011, 12:55 PM
[QUOTE=Gabe Suarez;1197968]The material below was taken from a journal on the effects of aging. Many of you fit in this category of "seasoned warriors".

[FONT=Arial]If you are a gunman, as warriors of the 21st century all are, the above facts creates even more challenges. These challenges have been attacked with all manner of creative sighting issues, but the only real answer that bypasses all of the issues facing the aging gunman is the TSD Combat Systems Red Dot installation.

I agree with the Red Dot when especially when your eyes get bad. I have very bad eyes anymore and after going to a couple eye doctors. Even one in Phoenix I was told that I was one of the few that even LASIK surgery wouldn't get my eyesight back to being that good anymore

charlie xray
07-30-2011, 07:13 PM
Let me offer some hope to some of you. I am 67 and began loosing my close vision at about 40, which is when it hits most of us. I was shooting IPSC then and switched to highpower when I started having problems with picking up my sights. The peep on my M14 pushed the problem back for a few years. Eventually that didn't help anymore. I tried bifocals and even considered trifocals, but that just wasn't very helpful. I eventually settled on contacts for distance and drug store readers for close. I experimented with white dots, since prior to that I was a hard-headed black-on-black sight kind of shooter, and the dots helped some. I then tried lasers and concluded that was a mixed bag and very little help.

The hope I spoke of in the beginning came when I developed cataracts a few years ago. I had the wagon wheel spoke kind that grows from the edged inward. When one spoke reached the center my sight in that eye, the vision degraded considerably with a brown blurry spot in the center. The doctor approved me for surgery under my insurance.

When I recovered I was expecting amazingly clear laser-like vision, but that didn't happen. Everything in that eye, right and dominant eye, was considerably brighter, but the vision was not quite as sharp as I expected. I complained. The doctor said he did that on purpose and showed me my new lens was a half doppler shy of 20/20, which was selected to improve my middle vision. Well guess what? Now I can see my sights!

The left eye still wears a contact corrected for distance. I am tickled pink with this unexpected development. When the left eye needs fixing it will be corrected for distance. I still wear cheap readers for close up but needed less often than before, and now shooting is a lot less frustrating. I can even use my computer without glasses if I lean back a bit. The only problem is I almost flunked my driver's license vision test. I couldn't read all the letters until I discovered squinting my right eye allowed me to see half of them and squinting my left allowed me to see the rest.

My next consideration is a red dot on at least one of my pistols and that should finish the job.

CX

gshayd
08-09-2011, 10:35 PM
My eyes just dont have that sharpness for shooting that they has when I was younger. I stopped shooting for a while actually. Then I discovered the Eotech optics and other red dot solutions and life was good again. I purchased a FN Tactical 45 and put a Burris Fasftfire on it. It was like getting new eyeballs. Red dots are the best thing since they invented sliced bread. However, some shooters thing its an act of heresy to put a red dot optic on a pistol. Then I join your forum see the TSD systems you have. Nice to see guys like you ahead of the curve.

Winchester67
08-10-2011, 11:34 AM
My old man is an aging Warrior...at 68 he had the LASIK surgery from the finest doctor available. In one of the few recorded instances of him going first class because it was, after all, his eyes, he had the surgery done. It helped, but not as much as the brochures promised. Doc said, which I believe, your mileage may vary. I am hoping for more advancements by the time I am old enough to need it. At this point, I am not impressed.

CanineDozer
08-10-2011, 07:01 PM
My ophthalmologist recommended against Lasik surgery for me when I told her I was looking for a way to improve my vision for "target" shooting. She said the procedure produces good enough results if all you want to do is (and I quote) "sit around at a tea party" but if you want to do target shooting it is just not the answer as it doesn't make the vision that sharp or clear. And their ophthalmology group does do those procedures so she wasn't talking against it for money reasons.

Tom Cornelius
08-10-2011, 07:10 PM
Actually, the seasoned Warriors that have purchased the TSD-17 Package have reported back to HQ with excellent results.

Winchester67
08-10-2011, 08:18 PM
Agreed on the TSD package. I got my old man to, finally, give up the revolver and go Glock 19. After he sees my Red Dot Glock, I know he will open his wallet, despite his well deserved reputation for being tighter than Gene Autrey's pants....

Winchester67
08-21-2011, 09:44 AM
By the way, my old man has had the LASIK surgery. (or however you spell it) It was performed by one of the best doctors available with a boatload of missons under his belt, but, frankly, it didn't work that well. He is better off than he was, but it does not work 100% a !00% of the time. Just something to think about.

TACC
08-21-2011, 09:59 AM
Actually, the seasoned Warriors that have purchased the TSD-17 Package have reported back to HQ with excellent results.

That is what I am hoping also tht is why I opted for the G17 TSD over the Lasik right now, we will see what happens.

silversport
08-21-2011, 03:26 PM
By the way, my old man has had the LASIK surgery. (or however you spell it) It was performed by one of the best doctors available with a boatload of missons under his belt, but, frankly, it didn't work that well. He is better off than he was, but it does not work 100% a !00% of the time. Just something to think about.

...and the reason I didn't have it done...I have heard this many times...

Bill