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View Full Version : Is the RDS worth it



badgerw
05-23-2011, 05:14 AM
You see this question raised on a number of Internet gun boards.

"Is the Red Dot Sight worth the cost of admission? Wouldn't I get the same or better improvement in my shooting by spending the same money on ammo and training?"

All I can tell you is what I have experienced.

For an honest comparison, let's tally up the cost.

Having OST mill your slide, install suppressor sights, and ship your slide back to you is about $300. A Trijicon RMR is about $450 or so. So the whole package is about $800.

What can you get for $800 in training and ammo?

A two-day class at a reputable school will cost you about $400. Most of those classes will take about 600 or more rounds of ammo. If you are buying 9mm at 20 cents per round, then you will spend about $120 to $150 on ammo. Unless the class is taught where you live, you have probably spent $50 or more on gas for the round trip, $100 for two nights in Motel 6, and $40 or $50 on meals.

Honestly, my shooting and my confidence in my shooting improved as much with an RDS as it did with any class I've taken.

Get a good class under your belt. Then get an RDS.

Then practice, practice, practice...

Then take another class.

Bill

Gabriel Suarez
05-23-2011, 05:36 AM
I will add, ever so humbly, to take a class with Suarez International, and not with a bullet golfer nor a martial target shooter. We will teach you to gunfight with your 21st century pistol in ways you never thought possible.

Gif
05-23-2011, 05:47 AM
I think it's absolutely worth it if you have trouble seeing your irons. In ACRG this weekend, I tried Gabe's RDS Glock. It makes the sight picture much easier. No doubt about that.

But... I still have young eyes. We did some long shots (75-100 yds) and we all learned it's all about trigger! I am still able to pick up the sharp lines on the Sevigny sights so I'm not sure if the RDS would offer me a huge advantage (maybe a smaller advantage). If your eyesight isn't clear, the RDS advantages will be huge!! This was discussed in length at the class.

Mike Erwin
05-23-2011, 05:50 AM
I have shot the RDS sighted Glock and it definitely makes a difference in your ability to place quality hits on target. It is definitely and upgrade to my Glock that is in the near future.

Take some rifle classes too! SI will improve your ability with rifles as well as pistols.


Mike

Jr. Urbina
05-23-2011, 06:35 AM
Bill and Coolhand77 brought RDS equipped pistols to my IPS class for everyone to check out. They are most definitely a force multiplier.

Tom Cornelius
05-23-2011, 08:10 AM
To ignore the advantages / advancement of a TSD Configured pistol is Luddite. It akin to saying there is no advantage to semi automatic weapons vs manually repeating weapons.

Coolhand77
05-23-2011, 10:52 AM
I was using that same G21 for point shooting practice last weekend. While point shooting, it was really easy to ignore the sight, but when you needed it, boom, its there. Wish I could afford to put one on ALL my pistols.

paranoid
05-23-2011, 11:33 AM
Mine is worth it. Period

badgerw
05-23-2011, 11:40 AM
I will add, ever so humbly, to take a class with Suarez International, and not with a bullet golfer nor a martial target shooter. We will teach you to gunfight with your 21st century pistol in ways you never thought possible.

I completely agree.

Prior to training with SI, my training was with the US Army (where I was taught by some IPSC guys who were appalled that I wanted to learn "combat" shooting) and a one-day class with a SWAT officer.

Now I've done several SI classes with Glenn Matthews, Craig Flaherty, Jon Payne, and JR Urbina.

And OST just sent back my G19 slide for my second RDS.

I believe in what I'm learning here and I've put my money (and my life) where my mouth is.

Bill

Jon Payne
05-23-2011, 12:15 PM
Hey Bro, see you in two weeks at the OGC.
I completely agree.

Prior to training with SI, my training was with the US Army (where I was taught by some IPSC guys who were appalled that I wanted to learn "combat" shooting) and a one-day class with a SWAT officer.

Now I've done several SI classes with Glenn Matthews, Craig Flaherty, Jon Payne, and JR Urbina.

And OST just sent back my G19 slide for my second RDS.

I believe in what I'm learning here and I've put my money (and my life) where my mouth is.

Bill

piratelooking@40
05-23-2011, 09:21 PM
"bullet golfer" made me lol

OldRonin
05-23-2011, 10:01 PM
My eyes are definitely getting "older". Perhaps its time I took a deep breath, sold two of my 1911 safe queens and put an RDS on my Glock 19. You only live once. And for us civilians, if there is to be a real-life shoot-out, the RDS is lots cheaper than a casket. For the LEO or those whose profession or environment are higher than average risk, its sounds like its turning into a must-have instead of an optional accessory. Hmmmm.....

bae
05-23-2011, 10:12 PM
I got my RDS for my Glock 19 just today, and I'm already a complete convert. This is a quantum improvement. I'll be getting some more.

(Hmm, I wonder what one would do on a J-frame or Rohrbaugh :-) )

JustMe
05-23-2011, 10:37 PM
Don't have one, yet.

Just went to the eyedoc today for new glasses. I'm about to get my first set of progressive lenses.

I'm actually far sighted and at one shoot I ran the day with safety glasses only and did great, but I always wear my glasses, can't read much without them. I also wear chums.

Give me back the eyesight I had when I was a kid and none of this would matter. The first time I looked through a red dot (rifle, never seen a pistol yet) I got it. The site picture is trivial to deal with given my personal visual status at this age.

One might say ditch the glasses with the draw, yeah right. My eye accommodation time is a whole lot longer than OODA loop time. Sequence the two and I'm toast. That's actually why I sometimes run drills without my glasses. Realworld there is a good chance they are not staying on.

From what I;d experianced I felt the red dot helped address some of these age related visual issues. It's on my todo list. But hell, I'm still sorting out 9mm versus .40! I've got a lot of other basics to sort out to!

badgerw
05-24-2011, 07:34 AM
The RDS is a decisive improvement for my eyesight.

I'm 53. I wear bifocals. With iron sights, I need to tilt my head back to clearly see my front sight. Counterintuitive in a fight, where I want my chin tucked down.

If I lose my glasses in the fight, I can hardly find the front sight. I ran an XS Big Dot on my G19, which helped a bit.

With the RMR, the dot is just as clear thru either the upper or lower lenses of my bifocals. Or without my glasses completely. Focus on the target. Put the dot where you want the bullets to go. Control the trigger. Reset the trigger and repeat as necessary...

Jager
05-24-2011, 10:01 PM
Lets not ignore the most obvious reason for a red dot sight, low light. As far as I can tell, the first documented use of an RDS in combat was in 1969. It's original purpose was to improve hits in low light/ darkness, which it did. Forty two years after this realization, some professional gunfighters still do not have this technology. I will guarantee your hit ratio will dramatically increase with the use of an RDS (in low light).

As others have stated, as I age my need for corrective lenses increases. I need glasses to shoot best with metallic sights. With an RDS I can score hits as good without prescription lenses. As to the original question, I have 2 EoTechs, 2 Aimpoint Micros, 2 NightForce (lighted reticule), 2 Russian scopes (lighted reticule), a Trijicon RMR, and a Burris FastFire II, so far... with another Micro and a Doctor on the must have list. Yes, it is worth it!