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RoninPimp
05-03-2005, 02:04 PM
Chop Suey Tokui Waza Ryu... What I've officially named my personal style. I apologize to the Chinese and Japanese languages for my Anglo bastardization of the two. Chop Suey as I understand it means "this and that" or basically a mish mash mix. Tokui Waza is just ones personal favorite techniques. Ryu is usually translated as "style". So this is just my "Mish Mash Mix of Favorite Techniques Style". Basically just a list of my current SD Toolbox. I've been meaning to get around to this for ages. So here it is to be critiqued.

I claim nothing new or exciting. I am completely unoriginal in my skill set. I'll leave the SD innovation others. I want tested techniques.

The first skill should go without saying, but I'll say it anyway. It's Awareness. Paying attention to who and what is going on around you is 99% of the battle IMO. I know this is preaching to the choir here. The rest of the tools are for when push comes to shove.

-UNARMED
I believe offense rules the day. I'm all for preemptive striking should the situation warrant it.

Stand Up
1. CM defense with a good sprawl
2. Overhand right axe-hand
3. Jab/cross combo
4. Lead leg push kick
5. Double leg
6. Clinch
I know there are many more effective stand up techniques, but stand up is the weakest link in my chain so I have to keep it simple.

Clinch
1. Establish control! i.e.: get under hooks
2. Knees
3. Hip throw
4. Trips (O soto w/a chin jab I like a lot, but all other trips are good too. Such as O uchi, Ko soto, and Ko uchi.)
5. Uppercut/Chin jab
6. Hook
7. Guillotine
8. Break away and return to "Stand Up"
Note: All throws/trips are done with the intention of remaining standing while the BG lands hard.

Ground
A-Top Game
1. Strike
2. Juji-gatame
3. Kimura/Americana
4. Choke (basic collar or RNC)
5. Stand up and apply the boot

B-Bottom Game
1. Recover guard!
2. Sweep to "Top Game"
3. Juji-gatame
4. Kimura
5. Choke (RNC, basic collar, or guillotine)

-ARMED
While I'm pretty familiar with firearms, (father was a gun owner and I served in the Marine Corps Reserve) I don't currently own any. I also live in "The People's Republik of MD" so carrying one legally isn't an option anyway. So my "ARMED" section is pretty basic. Techniques are all about offense. All items are explainable as non weapons too.

Climbing "Carabineer" as a knuckle duster.
Not much explaining needed but my technique would consist of...
1. Overhand right
2. Overhand right
3. Overhand right
4. Repeat steps 1-3

6 C-Cell Maglight
Techniques are again basic. Techniques 1 and 2 are straight from "Get Tough". Number 3 is easy for most American boys.
1. 2 handed grip horizontal smash to face
2. 2 handed grip thrust to face or body
3. 2 handed baseball bat swing to head, body, or knee

3 D-Cell Maglight
More basics. Learned this technique swinging a hammer doing construction work right out of HS.
1. 1 handed grip overhand right
2. 1 handed grip overhand right
3. 1 handed grip overhand right
4. Repeat steps 1-3

Folding Knife
I carry a large Sebenza most days for utility. Not sold as a "tactical" folder, but big (for a folder), strong, and sharp. Technique is basic of coarse.
1. Ice pick grip overhand right
2. Ice pick grip overhand right
3. Ice pick grip overhand right
4. Repeat steps 1-3
Not the most refined knife work, but hard to stop without extensive training.

Weapon training could be refined of coarse, but I feel the weapons listed are painfully effective so not much needs to be added. I've always wanted to spend some time with FMA. If I ever get the opportunity I'd then add a ASP to the list. The reason it's not here is because I've read some criticism of them for being too light. So I wouldn't want to try and use one unless I had a bunch of practice to develop striking speed and the footwork to go with it.

Please let me hear any opinions on additions or subtractions you think I should make.

-Philip Proctor

Belisarius
05-03-2005, 04:45 PM
I think that's a good list. With your background, I'm sure you can work in simple fist chokes from basically any position.

How are you executing your double-legs? I.e., is your lead knee dropping straight down into the ground when you penetrate?

I think your biggest decision issue from the "BJJ instinct perspective" will be when to stay in the mount or cross-body and when to go to the knee ride to take advantage of the mobility of that position (or even stand up without having ended things decisively on the ground yet). This is not something that there is a single, crisp answer for, but it may be where your BJJ screams one thing and your general awareness of the environment screams another.

With your other stuff, the fight will take care of itself: you'll knock the guy out while on your feet or crash and take him to the ground and end up in a dominant position.

Tegnerfan
05-03-2005, 06:28 PM
It's interesting that you posted that, cause just the other day at work, a co-worker asked me what style I practice,and I honestly answered "my own".My weapons training and everything has changed to suit me and no-one else.Good post!

RoninPimp
05-03-2005, 07:09 PM
I'm sure you can work in simple fist chokes from basically any position.
-Yeah, but I don't do that one much because I roll in a gi a lot. Gotta play with it more now that you mention it.


How are you executing your double-legs? I.e., is your lead knee dropping straight down into the ground when you penetrate?
-Not really, it goes down barely touching the ground as I drive through. I like a basic big lifting double leg.


I think your biggest decision issue from the "BJJ instinct perspective" will be when to stay in the mount or cross-body and when to go to the knee ride to take advantage of the mobility of that position (or even stand up without having ended things decisively on the ground yet).
-I've always been a proponent of knee-on for SD. In fact I've been thinking about playing with the position more while rolling. I've kinda shied away from it because I feel guilty doing it on smaller guys. We've got enough bigger good guys now.

Thanks for the comments. More are always welcome.

All-in fighting
05-04-2005, 12:11 PM
well rounded--ralph