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3rdDimension
08-20-2010, 08:53 AM
I have noticed an increasing number of dry cleaners attaching a permanent barcode with customer name to the inside of clothing that they clean.

This could pose a risk to someone ditching a cover garment etc...

HamburgO
08-20-2010, 12:37 PM
I have noticed an increasing number of dry cleaners attaching a permanent barcode with customer name to the inside of clothing that they clean.

This could pose a risk to someone ditching a cover garment etc...

:confused: Haven't seen this before. How is it permanent, sewn or glued on? Where I am, they still staple a tag through a buttonhole...

BillyOblivion
08-20-2010, 12:49 PM
:confused: Haven't seen this before. How is it permanent, sewn or glued on? Where I am, they still staple a tag through a buttonhole...

The better cleaners do this, at least the ones who keep up with technology. Been doing for a couple years.

Mike Erwin
08-20-2010, 12:51 PM
I have seen it here in Georgia. The last items that have come from the cleaners have a barcode that appears to be glued to the fabric. I tried, briefly, to pull it off without success.

Mike

Chuck Brick
08-20-2010, 03:46 PM
I'd take issue with this practice, personally, and make them remove the labels immediately. The clothes are mine, and if I pay someone to clean them, they are only to clean them - not modify them in any way I don't request or at least pre-approve. If I take my car to a mechanic, he'd better not put a bumper-sticker without my approval; same principle. OTOH my work uniforms are all bar-coded and I don't care; they belong to the service, so as long as they meet the terms of the contract (delivered clean/pressed/serviceable, and on time) they can do whatever they want.
Has nothing to do with ditching clothes, though; if I felt that might be necessary, I'd buy disposables at Goodwill.

Stay safe,

Chuck Brick.

RayMich
08-20-2010, 03:55 PM
I have seen it here where they actually write the customer's last name using a permanent marker.

I can see a major problem with this practice, if you later donate the garment to Good Will or some other charity and some BG ends up with it, uses it while committing a crime and subsequently ditches it. If the cops find it you are on the hook for the crime until you can prove otherwise, which may not be very easy to do if you encounter an unscrupulous DA.

HamburgO
08-20-2010, 05:00 PM
The better cleaners do this, at least the ones who keep up with technology. Been doing for a couple years.

Thanks, forewarned is forearmed! Good thing we're a little behind the times out here. My cleaners do a great job, and the only items I bring there are my custom-tailored dress shirts and suits. Any dry-cleaner sticks a permanent barcode in one of those items without at least trying to inform me first is going to have to deal with a highly unpleasant customer service issue...:mad:

BillyOblivion
08-20-2010, 05:50 PM
Thanks, forewarned is forearmed! Good thing we're a little behind the times out here. My cleaners do a great job, and the only items I bring there are my custom-tailored dress shirts and suits. Any dry-cleaner sticks a permanent barcode in one of those items without at least trying to inform me first is going to have to deal with a highly unpleasant customer service issue...:mad:

Usually they do it on the inside bottom of the placket, and is to keep it from getting lost.

I don't recall seeing it on any *dry cleaned* clothes, but just on laundered items. This is because tags don't stay on so good in the washing machine.

The thing is in what scenario do you foresee ditching a cover garment?

We don't normally wear fine clothing when we are expecting contact, and when we are expecting that sort of contact we wear tougher clothes. Or at least expecting the kind of contact that results in ditching the clothing.

I'm also thinking that if you DO expect that sort of contact a trip to a thrifty shop in a nicer area and the purchase (for cash) of a nice shirt with someone elses tags/name in it...

Chuck Brick
08-21-2010, 05:24 AM
...We don't normally wear fine clothing when we are expecting contact, and when we are expecting that sort of contact we wear tougher clothes....

Sometimes, "fine clothing" may cause an encounter such as a mugging/robbery, as it would indicate resources (money). If any such situation is likely, even remotely, most of us would simply be somewhere else. The only place I'll willingly, willfully engage is in my house or if my family is cornered.

Stay safe,

Chuck Brick.

eldon54
08-21-2010, 11:03 AM
MWCleaners (Men's Wearhouse) uses them. It was nice in the sense that your receipt said exactly what was cleaned (i.e. "Ann Taylor skirt") so it was easy to keep track of what they did. It did seem a little weird the first time I saw them on the clothes. We stopped using them because they messed two items of clothing and my wife is ruthless if a dry cleaner messes up her stuff. We are on our third dry cleaner this year. The one we use now does a good job (so far). Their computer system still runs on DOS!

ChuteTheMall
08-27-2010, 03:10 PM
If it hits the fan while you are wearing your fine drycleaned garments, take a moment to cut that label off before you ditch it. Destroy that scrap elsewhere.

Yet another reason to always carry some type of knife.

Just knowing that it's there is useful info; thanks!

Tripletap3
09-11-2010, 06:32 PM
I asked my cleaners about putting barcodes in the clothes and he told me that it is a very expensive computer system and that he would not be getting it. My guy said his old system works fine and if it is not broken don't fix it. I liked his answer. I would not use a cleaners that did that.

AlphaDawg
09-11-2010, 07:29 PM
Meh. Your DNA on the garment will give you away anyway. ;)

blackballed
09-11-2010, 07:32 PM
I had some uniforms sent to the cleaners regularly about 8 years ago and they put those tags in them. Being uniforms, I was not too concerned as my name was patched on them as well.

BillyOblivion
09-11-2010, 09:18 PM
Sometimes, "fine clothing" may cause an encounter such as a mugging/robbery, as it would indicate resources (money). If any such situation is likely, even remotely, most of us would simply be somewhere else. The only place I'll willingly, willfully engage is in my house or if my family is cornered.


Yes, but if you're wearing nice clothes you're not likely to want to dump them afterwards.

The context of this discussion (and sorry I'm late in coming back to it) is that dry cleaners are putting your name (or a number that can be traced to your name) in your clothes and if you have to dump your clothes after something happens they can trace your clothes to you.

I'm saying that the set of events where you'd need to dump your clothes and the set of events that you'd wear nice clothes to are generally disjoint.

If I get mugged wearing a 1000k Brooks Brothers suit (which I have. I bought it at a thrift shop for $15) and I shoot some guy I'm not going to worry about dumping the clothes.

Billing the family of the deceased for the dry cleaning bill might be OTT though.

BillyOblivion
09-11-2010, 09:21 PM
Thanks, forewarned is forearmed! Good thing we're a little behind the times out here. My cleaners do a great job, and the only items I bring there are my custom-tailored dress shirts and suits. Any dry-cleaner sticks a permanent barcode in one of those items without at least trying to inform me first is going to have to deal with a highly unpleasant customer service issue...:mad:

Dude, they've been writing your name, or some identifier in them for years. At least with your shirts.

Traditionally wool (and other stuff that was drycleaned) they just left the paper tags on because I guess the dry cleaning solvent didn't bother it. Now many dry cleaners (especially in big cities) are going to "greener" dry cleaning solvents (which really is good, the stuff works as well or better, doesn't harsh out the wool as much and isn't as toxic in the air) and I suspect some of those require the new tags.

BillyOblivion
09-11-2010, 09:22 PM
MWCleaners (Men's Wearhouse) uses them. It was nice in the sense that your receipt said exactly what was cleaned (i.e. "Ann Taylor skirt") so it was easy to keep track of what they did. It did seem a little weird the first time I saw them on the clothes. We stopped using them because they messed two items of clothing and my wife is ruthless if a dry cleaner messes up her stuff. We are on our third dry cleaner this year. The one we use now does a good job (so far). Their computer system still runs on DOS!

If you can find one, look for a "French Laundry". They do a lot of hand finishing/hand cleaning and are generally more expensive, but much gentler with clothing.

Cold War Scout
09-12-2010, 06:48 AM
I have not needed to have a suit drycleaned for 5 1/2 years now. All my clothes are washed at home. Even some of my dress pants before I retired were machine washable. And I hardly ever wore a sports jacket so I only kept one hanging in my office.

So in a nutshell I am way behind the times in this matter.

Can some of you guys maybe post a photo of what these barcodes look like? I am specifically interested in whether the info has any identifying info on you, or on the cleaners.

Bandolero
10-18-2010, 09:02 AM
At first I thought this thread was about another type of "dry cleaning." Also known as "cleaning runs."

NoBucks
10-18-2010, 09:08 AM
This company specializes in barcodes and has info for drycleaning retailers:
http://www.computype.com/solutions_industry_detail.cfm?oid=5168

Of course, it's presented as a plus for the customer.

ScottT
10-18-2010, 10:06 AM
This company specializes in barcodes and has info for drycleaning retailers:
http://www.computype.com/solutions_industry_detail.cfm?oid=5168

Of course, it's presented as a plus for the customer.

And it is. Rarely do they lose your laundry anymore.:)

NoBucks
10-18-2010, 10:07 AM
Yup, just like anything else, there are pros and cons. Personally, I just don't lke the idea of them adding something to my clothing, but I do appreciate the possibilities re:keeping track of your clothing in their system.

GreenerCleanerPlus
12-22-2010, 02:26 PM
Hi All,

Just happen to pass by this thread and as a Dry Cleaner owner I would like to let you know from the owners perspective, the why's and hows of the tagging.

The best method I have seen so far is this bar coding. The bar code that I use is a 1/4" x 1" bar code tag. No customer name or information, just a barcode, that is placed in a very obscure location on the garment, either on the backside of the bottom part of a shirt, the backside on the inside flap of a zipper for trousers, the backside of the product tag that has no information ect...
If done properly there is no damage done to the garment when applying the bar code which has a glued backing and is applied with a low temp heat seal/press.

The reason I use them is that I have a pick/up and delivery customer route with next day service. I have to turnover a high amount of garments per day and keep inventory accounted for at every step. My walk-in customers get the normal tags through open holes stapled as do my hotel customers, which have customer name and invoice number on it. Bar Codes are specific for my route customers. I have lost only 2 garments this year and I personally think the customers did not even give them to us because they weren't in our system. The speed and efficiency with the bar codes is second to none, as the route customers return the clothing with bar codes they are simply scanned into our system and we know exactly how to handle each garment as the information is stored (i.e. starch rating, creases, box or hanger ect...)

This bar code does not damage, decrease the value or appearance of the garment in any way. The only people who know it is there are the cleaner and the customer. If anyone has any questions relating to this or any other dry cleaning matter just let me know!

Also I was in the Army, Airborne paratrooper/battery armorer, I served with the 1/39th FAR ABN, which was under the 18th Airborne Corps at Ft. Bragg, NC. in case yous were wondering why a dry cleaner was checking out the site.

Regards,
Frank

Charlie Barham
12-22-2010, 06:34 PM
Welcome to WT, GCPlus. And thanks for the info. Even dry cleaners have to know how to protect themselves.