PDA

View Full Version : Cop gloves



Vinnie Moscaritolo
11-28-2003, 05:21 PM
I am looking for a recomendation for a pair of gloves that work for day to day usage with the public.. should do the usual, not allow cut throughs, etc.. any ideas?

Sam Spade
11-29-2003, 12:16 AM
I am looking for a recomendation for a pair of gloves that work for day to day usage with the public.. should do the usual, not allow cut throughs, etc.. any ideas?
Hatch Resisters. Dress gloves with a Kevlar lining. Great for sharp metal, broken glass, etc, whether you run into those things at a MVA or in the hands of a psycho.

Grey Wolf
11-30-2003, 12:36 AM
I use Hatch Specialist ( neoprene/ leather gloves) and they work good. They will not keep your hand from getting cut (but you should be as careful as possible anyway.)

FWIW I tried the Resistors, and did not like them. I ordered some from Streicher's and ended up trying three different sized pairs and none of them fit me. I have tried a few other "slash/cutproof" gloves and can not find any that fit me.... YMMV :mad:

If at all possible I reccomend you find a palce you and "try before you buy" so you don't end up with a bunch or store credit (like I did :rolleyes: )

Be safe

Grey Wolf

Persuader
12-04-2003, 03:25 AM
I wear the super thin hatch "Friskmasters' made with the Pittards hairsheep leather (Whatever that is :D ).

I tried the kevlar / fluid resistant ones a few years ago. Because they were so bulky, I failed to detect a pistol on a pat down. The guy was wearing two pairs of pants and had the pistol concealed in the hip pocket of the first pair. Because the gloves were so thick, I just didn't feel the gun. Suffice it to say that I never wore them again....

mercop
12-04-2003, 06:38 PM
I wear the Nomex Pilots gloves in black and just have them cut down to wrist length.

MACOP
12-07-2003, 08:32 AM
I have often thought of buying these type gloves, but one thing stops me-how do you clean them?

I mean, we deal with alot of dirty, sick people. Heroin addicts come to mind first.

Recently, after a foot chase, my partner was patting the suspect down after he handcuffed him The suspect had defecated in his pants, and my buddy was unlucky enough to touch the messy trousers. He was gloveless.

This suspect was a heroin addict.

Now say we are wearing these leather gloves, and pat down the aforementioned suspect. How do we clean these gloves?
*************************
It's good to have a plan.
SteveB

michael
12-07-2003, 12:12 PM
I always carried a large bottle of rubbing alcohol in my trunk, and after every encounter with a BG, whether I had glove on or not, I would wash down my hands or gloves. I was always paranoid about getting some disease, but fortunately it must have worked because I never did.

MACOP
12-10-2003, 01:53 PM
But what effect does the rubbing alcohol have on the leather?

And, isn't leather very porous? Once the contaminants are in the material, aren't they extremely difficult to get out?

If someone can explain a good decon procedure for these gloves, I would buy a pair. But I am reluctant to spend the money and then cross-contamanaint everything I touch.
********************
It's good to have a plan.
SteveB

Persuader
12-11-2003, 02:52 AM
The alcohol is a temporary measure. One word of advise though, alcohol gel will dry out the leather. I usually wash mine with anti bacterial dishsoap, inside and out, on my days off and apply a leather conditioner to keep them soft.

MACOP
12-11-2003, 04:12 PM
Maybe I am making too much of this subject. But.........

Lets say I make an arrest, and cuff the subject up, patting him down before I put him in the backseat of the cruiser.

While no orifice is leaking any bodily fluids, the subject is just plain NASTY.

Now, I get in the driver's seat and take him (or her) to the station.

I take my gun out of the holster and put it in the lock box when I get to booking.

My leather gloves are on the whole time.

Now, I have touched this nasty subject, and then various parts of the cruiser, and my holster and gun, and my car keys and so on.

WHile the decon procedures are adequate for later on in the shift, what do you guys do immediately AFTER the arrest to avoid passing this jerks nasty germs to everything that is touched?

I should also mention this - I am somewhat predudiced against these gloves. I only know a couple of guys who use them, and they are, shall we say, not the best cops I know. We actually goof on the leather gloves and the guys wearing them.
*********************************
It's good to have a plan.
SteveB

michael
12-11-2003, 06:54 PM
I only wore the leather gloves when it was cold, not all the time. I always kept surgical gloves handy for the really nasty pukes and used then when I had time,which is of course not always possible. I think the biggest thing to do is decon your hands asap. Like I said earlier in the post, I kept a large bottle of rubbing alcohol in my trunk, and immediately after placing the scumbag in the back seat, I would saturate my hands with it, rubbing it in real good, and then using a paper towel from my trunk to dry my hands. Upon reaching the intake, I would then wash with warm water and soap. I only used the alcohol on the leather gloves in cold weather, and about once a week I would use leather conditioner. I never had a problem with them like this, and each pair would get me through at least one winter season. Anything that you touch and contaminate with your hands must be scrubbed with alcohol or lysol, including your steering wheel, firearm, stick and cuffs. You can never be too careful about getting infections or diseases, because as you know, many of the people cops deal with are druggies and have aids, hepatitis or tb.

Persuader
12-12-2003, 09:13 PM
If you are that concerned, wear latex gloves and change them after every contact. You can take it one step further and wear a repirator in case the guy has TB or some other respiratory infection. Don't forget the safety glasses in case he spits or sneezes on you..... I don't mean to belittle your concerns, but there are no guarantees in law enforcement. You WILL come into contact with nasty people and their bugs. The best you can do is wear some sort of barrier, keep the disinfectant handy and wash your hands on a regular basis.......

MACOP
12-13-2003, 04:48 AM
If you are that concerned, wear latex gloves and change them after every contact. You can take it one step further and wear a repirator in case the guy has TB or some other respiratory infection. Don't forget the safety glasses in case he spits or sneezes on you..... I don't mean to belittle your concerns, but there are no guarantees in law enforcement. You WILL come into contact with nasty people and their bugs. The best you can do is wear some sort of barrier, keep the disinfectant handy and wash your hands on a regular basis.......


I DO wear the latex gloves and change them after every contact.

While we had a TB scare a few years ago, I never went with the respirator.

I have been spit on, but I skipped the glasses too. I do keep a 'spit mask' in the cruiser though, that we got from the hospital.

I fully understand that there are no guarantees in LE. I have come into contact with my share of nasty people. I just have never agreed with the concept behind wearing the leather gloves ALL THE TIME, and have never had anyone explain a good decontamination procedure to me.
*********************************
It's good to have a plan.
SteveB

Ragin Cajun
12-16-2003, 07:47 AM
Sorry, double tap.

Ragin Cajun
12-16-2003, 07:47 AM
How about putting on the disposable gloves (oversized) on top of whatever pair you like. Then, once you finish the job, pitch them and the good gloves are still OK.

I sure don't want to touch anything else after doing a pat down, search, etc. Even "touching" some of these "beings" is too much. Get them in the back seat and pitch the soiled gloves. ICK!

BTW, I use the industrial strength disposable gloves(alone or over other gloves,) not the flimzy, junky latex ones. They are made of Nitrolite or some such. They cost more but more than worth it.

Keep a soft drink bottle of 50% bleach for serious clean-up and the waterless anti-bacterial soap for general use frequently during the shift.

Gotta protect ourselves from all the *rap and things out there! And becareful how you wash your uniforms.

DaveJames
12-16-2003, 01:46 PM
Laytex is fine but I have found some of the troops had a reaction to them, I say the thinner the better, I like the Hacth stuff, but don't wear them, I bumbed a box of the heavy laytex off of our EM's and always keep a pair in my cuff case, in winter I wear dyed doe skin gloves, if they get dirty I throw them away, I keep 3 sets in my locker, their not cheap but its easier then trying to clean them if they're really messed up, other wise I take them to the local dry cleaner, and have them clean just like any other leather product

georgel
12-16-2003, 10:37 PM
For those with reaction to the latex gloves, the standard substitute is nitrile. They are usually blue and as mentioned a little more expensive but still disposable and seem to be a little more durable. Heck, I just used a pair to work with the Christmas tree to keep the sap off my hands. The reaction to latex is usually to the powder that makes them go on easier. Latex gloves are also available without the powder.
The bleach spray is a good idea, but 50% may be a little high. I think the standard solution used in restaurant kitchens is about 1 part per million? It's about one cap in 1 gal of water. It's enough to kill salmonella on counter tops. The lower concentration helps reduce the likelyhood of getting little permanent "spots" on your clothing.

7677
12-18-2003, 11:34 AM
I have a pair of the Hatch neoprene/synthetic leather gloves. I wear them when it is cold outside. I through my gloves in the washer with the whatever soiled clothes I was wearing at the time. I also have a container of anti-bacterial wet wipes that I carry in my vehicle along with stronger types of disinfectant soaps. If I know I'm dealing with a contaminated person or zone
I have the equipment to goto level C and with support on scene I can go up to Haz-Mat level A suit.

Lobo103
01-03-2004, 07:17 PM
I usually use Latex surgical gloves for search and any contact w/ grungy suspects. For general use I like the Hatch Specialists or Elite Marksman (?). I used a pair of the Marksmans during some pretty intesive obstacle course runs. They hold up really well. I don't wear them all of the time on patrol. Only in cold weather to keep my hands warm (hey there is an idea!), and during more tactical scenarios such as entries, just for general protection.

InTheBlack
01-24-2004, 07:52 PM
Rubbing alcohol isn't a very good disinfectant vs the important (ie nasty) bugs.

I used to use a spray by Sporocidin International that has enough Phenol to do the job, on rubber respirators.

Remember that true "disinfection" requires 10 minutes of wet contact for the nasty bugs; if there's something new that requires less time I'd like to know about it.

zombie207
02-14-2004, 02:43 AM
Remember to thoroughly cover any cuts or nicks on your hands and fingers. Bandaid and plenty of tape. After I've put the suspect in the back seat I take my gloves off and put them in the passinger seat. Once we get to the jail I put on a pair of Latex gloves and pitch them when I'm done, then go wash my hands. My other gloves I use a Quantinary disinfectent (good for most nasties) on them that I got from the local hospital. They gave me a spray bottle of it and when ever I run low I go back for a refill.
I use the Hatch Streetguard w/Kevlar

Seppo Vesala
02-15-2004, 12:48 PM
I use cut resistant leather gloves, and I rub them clean with "alcohol jelly" that is designed to clean wounds. It does not harm the gloves (I have used the same pair for at least 5-6 years). Sometimes I use disposable latex cloves.

Couple of days ago I bought latex cloves ("semi-reusable") that are cut/puncture resistant. Actually I havenīt used them yet, but they seem great.

Yamdog
02-15-2004, 09:42 PM
I use the Hatch Resistors. They are Kevlar lined and fit well enough to maintain pretty good dexterity.

Seppo Vesala
02-16-2004, 04:16 AM
One more thing: You should not be paranoid about the issue. There is always some risk involved no matter what you do, but on the other hand the risk of infection is pretty low (for example, about 0,6% on HIV with direct blood contact). And the viruses die pretty fast when out of human system (as a rule of thumb, the viruses die when blood or saliva has dried).