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View Full Version : How useful is trap,skeet, sporting clays for developing "practical skills"



billcameron
10-27-2003, 04:16 PM
I saw thread on where and how people practice with their shotguns for defensive uses. So my question is how useful is trap, skeet or sporting clays for developing "practical skill" with a shotgun? I would think skeet and esp sporting clay ground targets would be most relevant esp if you used your defensive shotgun.

John Silver
10-27-2003, 04:21 PM
I am of the opinion that all trigger time is good. Be it speed shooting steel, popping tin cans with a .22, precision rifle, or shooting clay pigeons.

Trap, skeept, and sporting clays teach you to engage dynamic targets that at least have some variety of path, and you have to do so within a short amount of time.

Just as college teaches one to think so that you are flexible to solve all sorts of problems, so does learning flexible gun skills allow you to solve a wide variety of situations.

In short, it's not combat training, but it is good training which can be applied to combat.

Wulfenite
10-27-2003, 05:14 PM
I too think all triger time is good.

I once took a buddy to an IPSC match. He had been shooting waterfoul and game animals since he was a lad but had never done any more pistol shooting than plinking or finishing off a deer. At the match he took to it like no newbie I've ever seen. Absolutely unflapable. It was clear that even though he didnt know the rules he was thinking on his feet and making hits and keeping his gun running.

Clearly there is some value to cross training. I would suspect that the defensive shooter who took up clay shooting would develop a real knack for swinging onto a target and pulling the trigger to make the hit without actually stopping on the target. Valuable perhaps for multiple targets. I'd imagine that he would also get real specific about having a correctly fitting stock.

Rosco Benson
10-27-2003, 05:17 PM
Trigger time is trigger time. However, some pursuits can ingrain some bad habits. I've noted that most trap shooters start with the shotgun's safety off...rather than incorporating operating it into one's gun mount. This can build some bad habits.

Rosco

Hasher
10-27-2003, 06:17 PM
Trigger time is trigger time. However, some pursuits can ingrain some bad habits. I've noted that most trap shooters start with the shotgun's safety off...rather than incorporating operating it into one's gun mount. This can build some bad habits.

Rosco

Heck take you fighting gun Skeet ot trap shooting. Every time you change stations load one through the port and run one in the mag and do it from you side saddle or but cuff. Get all you manipulations in. Plus it drives the regulars nuts. LOL. I hav edone it in the past and it is a great way to learn to run the gun.

Hasher

Anthony
10-28-2003, 12:20 PM
I saw thread on where and how people practice with their shotguns for defensive uses. So my question is how useful is trap, skeet or sporting clays for developing "practical skill" with a shotgun? I would think skeet and esp sporting clay ground targets would be most relevant esp if you used your defensive shotgun.

Hi Bill,
My 2 cents worth. ( As usual I'll go on alittle. - Sorry.)
In England in 1976 I bought my first 12 gauge - a Mossberg 6-shot pump with an adjustable choke.( In those days a bulbous thing on the end of the brl, - not internal like today.)
I was 16 and just wanted to shoot. ANYTHING !
I'd had a few lessons at Trap, so I went every weekend to a local Skeet club ( a spotty faced 16 yr old, arrives on push-bike, with an "American pump gun", - you can imagine the looks I got from the Land/Range-rover "landed gentry"!)
For about 6 months I shot there ( beating many members - not the very best - of course ) untill I got into a pistol club and sort of just stopped showing up.
2 years latter into the Royal Marine Commandos and the practise at Skeet payed off with fast, close CQB drills, with a FAL.
In 1981/82 in the Falklands ( before the war ) I shot alot of clays again ( with a Mossberg 8-shot - slug sights.)
On return to England after the war I bought an Ithaca ( having lost the Mossberg during the war ) and started "Practical Shotgun" shooting. The shoots were staged on weekends when there wasn't a pistol shot. In those days a Brit could easily buy a shotgun. A good American pump could be bought for a tenth of the price of a cheap English double. Most ( if not All, shooters were NOT Clay shooters.)
I swept the board consistantly. It seemed so easy that it became boring, ( as competition - not as training !)
To answer your question - YES.
If a shotgun is to be used for defensive/CQB work, then get some Clay practise in ! - Amongst other types of training of course - tactics, mindset, range ( distance ) considerations, slugs ( to be able to "reach out") etc etc.
Anthony.