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Gabriel Suarez
09-26-2003, 06:31 PM
Just got done with my workout. I'll be sore tomorrow.

Here's what I'm doing -

Day One -
Bench Press
Close Grip Bench Press
Rotator Cuff Exercise

Day Two -
Squats
Bent Over Rowing
Shrugs

Day Three -
Deadlifts
Hatfield Deadlifts
Standing Push Press

What do you guys do?

Jim Mayhugh
09-26-2003, 06:58 PM
I'm old and BUFF (Air Force Term - means Big Ugly Fat Fucker).

To change this situation, I'm getting a job as a part-time Bailiff in Boulder City, Nevada. This job requires that I be at least POST Category 2 certified. This means that I have to attend a POST Academy, and pass the same physical fitness standards that guys 20-30 years my junior need to pass.

To that end, I started on the Atkins diet in May, and have lost 40 pounds so far. I'm also running, and doing heavy weights to increase my upperbody strength. Also situps and pushups.

So far so good.

Mark IV
09-26-2003, 07:38 PM
I have had really good luck using the Body for Life woprkout routine, if everyone is not familiar with it here are the basics:

Day 1 Upper Body Training Chest/Shoulders/Triceps/Back/Biceps
Day 2 Cardiovascular Workout
Day 3 Lower Body and Abs Training Quads/Hamstrings/Calves/Abdominals
Day 4 Cardiovascular Workout
Day 5 Upper Body Training Chest/Shoulders/Triceps/Back/Biceps
Day 6 Cardiovascular Workout
Day 7 Rest

Me and a few of my buddies have put together a training group, on the cardio days we get together and practice martial arts. Day one cardio is strictly conditioning; i.e., teaming up into partners and punching or kicking on target pads in one minute relays.

Day two cardio, we learn new moves and work on them. Day three we spar full-contact using protective gear. Like I said this workout plan has worked very well for me.

M700
09-27-2003, 04:49 AM
I like mixing lifting with cardio and martial arts training. It seems that no matter how much I run or cycle, a good hour-long kickboxing session still wears me out. Great stuff - working out makes my day complete. Average 4 - 5 workouts a week of one kind or another.

For lifting I've shifted to doing more pulling type exercises, like lat pulls & rowing. I used to do a lot of benchpress, but didn't see that I was really accomplishing much, except improving my bench.

Am also real fond of the total-body lifts like squat, deadlift, and military press - taken all the way from the floor to overhead.

Regards, Guy

michael
09-27-2003, 09:07 AM
I use a combination of things, including weights, martial arts and body weight exercises. My workout usually goes something like this:
Day 1 Dumbell presses(4 sets) and flyes(2-3 sets), shoulder presses(3 sets) and lateral raises(3 sets).
Day 2 Pound the heavy bag/stretching (30 minutes+10 minutes)
Day 3 Pull-ups (4 sets of 12-15)
Day 4 Lying triceps extensions(4 sets) that I superset with triceps presses. Biceps e-z curl bar curls(4 sets), dumbell curls(3 sets).
Day 5 Rest
Day 6 Hindu squats (300+), Hindu push-ups(3 sets of 25 each)
Day 7 Rest

This order changes somewhat week to week--I get bored easily, but always do these or similar things every week. I always do the pull-ups, hindu squats and hindu push-ups, but may change the weights around as my body adapts to it. You have to keep your body guessing to get maximum benefits. For the last two years, I did Krav Maga about 3 days a week and am now looking at Hock Hochheim's system for possible study.

SMDS141
09-27-2003, 02:01 PM
Has anyone tryed working out with KB's? I have and let me tell you it makes a lot of sense. You generate your power from the waist/legs, which all you pugilists out there know is where true fighting/striking power is generated. It gives you an aerobic and lifting workout at the same time letting you kill two birds with one stone. It works you in a more realistic, concerted way, having your whole body working at the same time. Not to mention it's fun in a sadistic kind of way. I think Pavel Tsatsouline, unsure if I spelled that correctly, is the guru of the moment with these things. If you're looking to spice up your work out routine give it a try.

Gabriel Suarez
09-27-2003, 02:51 PM
haven't tried KBs. I hear they are good, but the thing about regualr weights is that you can always find a gym, whereas finding one with KBs is not as easy.

I did stumble accross an article at Pavel's site on weight training which I've been using to great benefit.

It involves using major exercises such as Bench Press, Squats, etc.
You do a couple of warm-ups and then go for a set of four singles, resting the bar between singles, and then add weight for the last rep.

Liberty or Death
09-27-2003, 04:33 PM
Just got done with my workout. I'll be sore tomorrow.

Here's what I'm doing -

Day One -
Bench Press
Close Grip Bench Press
Rotator Cuff Exercise

Day Two -
Squats
Bent Over Rowing
Shrugs

Day Three -
Deadlifts
Hatfield Deadlifts
Standing Push Press

What do you guys do?



Day One (3 Sets of Each)
_One-Arm Dumbbell Rows
_Barbell Rows
_Dumbbell Lateral Raise
_Bicep Curls
*w/Dumbbell
*w/ Barbell
_Squats
_Good Mornings

Day Two (3 Sets of Each)
_Flyes
_Bench Press
_Incline Flyes
_Incline Bench Press
_Barbell Tricep Press
_One-Arm Dumbbell Tricep Press
_Barbell Tricep Press
_Barbell Flexor Wrist Curl
_Barbell Extensor Curl

Day Three
_Pushup
_Bardip
_Arm Rotation
_Neck Rotation
_Neck Fore and Aft
_Handgrip

On Alt. Day Three
_Overhand Chinup (Wide Grip)
_1-Arm Pushup
_Overhand Chinup (Medium Grip)
_Overhand Chinup (Narrow Grip)
_Arm Rotation
_Neck Rotation
_Neck Fore and Aft
_HandGrip

5 Days/Week
_Abdominals
_Stretch

When I have time I try to get in three days of cardio (jogging) per week

Patrick Downs
09-29-2003, 04:37 PM
I haven't heard of KBs before, but here's a link I found with my curiousity piqued:

http://www.dragondoor.com/kettlebells/rkc_hist.html

They sound really interesting.

Pavel = Pavel Tsatsouline (fyi)

Seppo Vesala
09-30-2003, 12:19 PM
I like heavy duty -type of exercise. Currently I use Power factor training by John Little and Pete Sisco.

It seems amazing, but if you divide the muscle groups to two workouts, train about once each week, and do just 2-4 sets per muscle group, you start getting results! That totals two workouts a month for each muscle group, but that is enough (and more could be too much), provided you train hard enough.

For cardio, I hit the bag and attend boxing classes (Iīm new to the sport of boxing, but it feels great). Boxing is one of the few martial arts that teach you to really hit hard (a thing that should not understate). Another great advantage of boxing is that itīs easy to train alone.

Gabriel Suarez
09-30-2003, 12:30 PM
Seppo,

I'm not familiar with Power factor training. Where can I find some stuff about it. It sounds alot like what I'm doing. My bench is back over 300 after a few years of lay-off, and it got there via heavy, minimal training.

michael
09-30-2003, 05:20 PM
Seppo,

I'm not familiar with Power factor training. Where can I find some stuff about it. It sounds alot like what I'm doing. My bench is back over 300 after a few years of lay-off, and it got there via heavy, minimal training.

I did a Google search and found the following:
www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sisco.htm (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sisco.htm)

Sisco also has a book on amazon.com for sale.

Seppo Vesala
09-30-2003, 10:15 PM
I'm not familiar with Power factor training. Where can I find some stuff about it.

Itīs available on Amazon.com (the price is $11,17). In short, you do only strongest-range partial reps, and time the workout. The efficience of workout is calculated with two simple formulas, and it is based on total weight lifted (weight x reps), divided by time used. One of the main advantages of the system is that you have a mathematical formula you can use to determine whether you are overtrained, or if you have found an optimal trainig frequency.

The system is controversial, of course. But then, all high intensity training systems are...

Chuck Rylant
10-01-2003, 12:58 AM
The older I get the more I realize it takes longer to recover from weight training than it used to. I have found that less is more when training with heavy weights. I have recently, last two years, switched to compound movements only, and eliminated the isolated movements. I only lift two days a week and I am stronger than when I was doing four days a week. These changes have produced the bigest strength gains ever. That is my opinion and the following is my simple workout.

Day 1

Deadlifts
Pullups w/ added weight
Barbell Shrugs

Day 2
Squats
Bench Press
Millitary Press

Gabriel Suarez
10-01-2003, 06:29 AM
Chuck,

Good routine. The only thing I do different is Bench and Squat on different days. And do Bent Rowing instead of pullups.

Darwin-101-
10-02-2003, 01:25 AM
I was told by one of your students that you had been in Kyokushin Karate (Masutatsu Oyama style) for quite a while.

is this true and if so, how do you keep it up on the road?
I guess we could ask the same about the weight training as well,
with your schedule how do you fit it in?

Gabriel Suarez
10-02-2003, 07:43 AM
"
I was told by one of your students that you had been in Kyokushin Karate (Masutatsu Oyama style) for quite a while.

is this true and if so, how do you keep it up on the road?
I guess we could ask the same about the weight training as well,
with your schedule how do you fit it in?"

Started Kyokushin in 1970. Got up to Sandan. Now, I train at home mostly. We have a group in Northern Az that has similar ideals and we keep the skills up this way. The weights are always easy to find, and if not, a day or three away from the weight pile never hurts.

Cold War Scout
10-03-2003, 10:57 AM
Weights
----------
All muscle group exercises Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday

Running, Flexibility
--------------------
Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Orienteering
--------------
Sunday

VaughnT
10-03-2003, 04:50 PM
I'm using the EAS/BFL system right now, but I'm not worrying about the diet aspect. I hurt my rotator cuff about 2yrs ago and laid off all workouts..big mistake but I'm lazy by nature.

With their book laid out as it is, I choose to do my supporting muscles (deltoids, traps, lats) before benching. Filling these muscles with blood keeps the shoulder joint stable while benching and allows me to bench a heavier weight....or bench with a clean range of motion...both of which are critical to gaining size and strength.

For cardio, I'm on the treadmill for 20 minutes and can usually get 1.5mi out of it if I sprint for 1-1.5 minutes at least four times. My weight and smoking habit preclude my running for longer times.

Having started this program about 3.5mo ago, I'm down roughly 15lb and have definitely firmed up in the arms and chest. The gut is still quite noticeable, but that's where I store my fat and it will be the last thing to go. The upside to that is that it makes my work safer...a natural bullet-proof vest.

What I really like about the BLF/EAS system is the mind work. This is the only organization that I've seen that constantly stresses hard work and perseverance, not the quick fix diet pill. These folks don't try to lie to you and are always offering an encouraging word. I would strongly suggest that you read a few issues of their periodical, Muscle Media, available at newsstands everywhere.

Does their system work? Well, four years ago I weighed a solid 450lbs. Yesterday I weighed in at 307.

It definitely took some pain and endurance on my part. Many a night saw me taking a handful of aspirin before bed. But I'd do it again.

My goals are to slim down to 220, but not to just lose weight. I want to be solid when I hit that mark and think that it's possible. Heck, if I can drop 150 in something around two years, I can do anything. I just have to be willing to pay the price in sweat and tears.

Oh, and I definitely prefer compound movements where applicable.

MACOP
10-03-2003, 06:23 PM
I have found that running and push ups and pull ups and some 'gut work', combined with Krav Maga 3 times or so a week works for me.
**************************************************
It's good to have a plan.
SteveB

jacketch
10-05-2003, 05:50 PM
Like Chuck Rylant I have found as I get older that the recovery time expands. Less lifting and more cardio work seems to keep me in shape. Pull ups, squats, push ups, crunches in addition to isometric work (actions similar to weapon retention fighting) and light lifting keep me trim and cycling 75 to 100 miles on weekends keeps me aerobically fit. At 56 I am in better shape (and stronger) than I was at 25. Lots of stretching helps shorten the recovery time.

Vinnie Moscaritolo
10-10-2003, 08:49 PM
Day One -
Bench Press
Close Grip Bench Press
Rotator Cuff Exercise

Day Two -
Squats
Bent Over Rowing
Shrugs

Day Three -
Deadlifts
Hatfield Deadlifts
Standing Push Press

What do you guys do?

Gabe;

Good, you are doing the basics and not wasting time with small stuff. may I suggest the following, make your day three the back and deadlift day. if you are going to do shrugs do em after your deadlifts.. if you need to do more back, then do some pullups, even if you focus on the negative side..

the idea is that you work the chest and pushing muscles such as triceps on the same ticket, work the pulling such as back or biceps on the same day as deadlifts.. and the legs from squats should be enough for one day..

you could substitute the tricep extensions for close grip
or do them in combination, after the bench press.

since squats and deadlifts are really large muscle groups, you should be willing to work them hard and heavy.. never be afraid to do heavy weights as long as you keep good form...
you dont have to many sets, a warmup and 2 good power sets is enough, if you can do ten reps its too light, if you cant do 6 its too heavy..

all and all you should be able to get in an out of the gym in a hour. no more.

I am glad you are doing rotators, as we get older, those can be problems.

stretch when you are done..


Me, I personally like to carry transmissions around the garage or maybe carry my son on my shoulders.. up and down the hills on
my property.. that'll be enough at times.

Vinnie Moscaritolo
10-10-2003, 08:51 PM
oh btw. large amounts of vitamin C the next day and some motrin is a must as you get older.. or maybe thats all that tamashawari I used to do... (dumb ass)

Yojimbo
10-13-2003, 01:24 PM
I workout on a 4 day split. I usually do 4 on than 1 day off more as needed.

This my typical workout but I change things around if I need to do specific work. The rep range will also go up and down depending if I'm doing heavy, modrate or light weights.

I also like to toss in a few weeks of bodyweight PT training so I don't get burned out.

Day 1-Chest, Triceps, Abs and Calves

Chest
Flat Bench Press 4x10
Incline Bench Press 3x10
Flat Bench Flyes 2x10-15
Dips 2xFailure

Triceps
Overhead Barbell Extensions 3x10
Cable tricep Pushdowns 3x10

Calves

Standing Calve Raises 3x10-20
Seated Calve Raises 3x10-20

Abs
Crunches 2x20
Seated Knee Tucks 2x20
Reverse Crunches 2x20


Day 2-Lats, Rear Delt and Abs

Lats
Deadlifts 4x10
Bent Rowing 4x10
Pulldowns 4x10 or Chins 4xFailure

Rear Delts
Bent Lateral Raises 3x10
Rear Upright Rowing 3x10

Abs
Crunches 2x20
Seated Knee Tucks 2x20
Reverse Crunches 2x20


Day 3-Front and Side Delts, Biceps, Calves and Abs


Biceps
Barbell Curls 4x10
Alternate Dumbbell curl 2x10

Delts
Press Behind the Neck 3x10
Side Laterals 3x10
Uprigt Rowing 3x10

Calves

Standing Calve Raises 3x10-20
Seated Calve Raises 3x10-20

Abs
Crunches 2x20
Bench Knee Tucks 2x20
Reverse Crunches 2x20

Day 4-Legs and Abs

Quads
Squats 5x10, 3x5
Leg Extensions 2x20-50

Hams strings
Stiff Legged Dead Lift 4x10
Leg Curls 2x20-50

Abs
Crunches 2x20
Seated Knee Tucks 2x20
Reverse Crunches 2x20

* Perform 15-40 Minutes of Aerobic activities on the off days. Running, Biking, Sprint/Jog, Rope work.

** If trying to cut weight do 30-40 or aerobics after each workout and on also on off days.

VaughnT
10-13-2003, 06:37 PM
Well, gentlemen, today marked a high point in my lifting career.

I was supposed to do cardio but decided to work the chest and shoulders again in hopes of beefing up this area. As we all know, a thick upper torso is something respected by the badguys. It's a visible sign of your physical strength.

Today, I knocked out 225 on the incline bench. It might only have been two reps, and neither very clean, but it's a long way from where I was when I started back on this road after a rotator cuff injury.

Like any other endeavor, shooting or knife-fighting or knuckle-dusting, if you stick with it, you can do it. A wise man once wrote that you should plan the work and then work the plan if you want to be successful. Today was proof that that works. Visualize your goals and then work to meet them.

Where do I go from here? Well, I have a ton of blubber to lose and that means more cardio. I might have to cut down on the leg exercises so I can get more time on the treadmill without hurting my overall performance at work, but that's a small sacrifice and one I can reverse somewhere down the road.

Just thought I'd brag for a minute. Hope you all are having a wonderful day.