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unstpabl1
03-11-2007, 02:28 PM
I've been having a lot of tightness in my neck causing headaches and soreness tightness running thru the center of my back,under the shoulder blades & lower lats. When I try to w/o, it tightens and either causes headaches or soreness. I get deep tissue and an adjustment when I can afford it. I use a tennis ball every so often against a wall to work the knots out. I'm getting very frustrated as this has been going on awhile and is stoping me from working out. The chiro hasn't given me any excercises to rehab it or work around it. I can't really afford to see him a couple times a week for life.:D Its all muscular. I'm looking for resources/ help on working out around it and rehabing it. self help;) I appreciate any help
mike

LastManOut
03-11-2007, 03:15 PM
I had/have the similar problem. I thought it was muscular too. Pain from under the scapula, up to the base of the skull. The pain causes muscle tightness, aggrevating the headache.

Fifteen years ago I had C-3/C-4 rupture, probably from sports. Surgery solved that problem 95% after my left arm began to atrophy. Just a bit of arthritis setting in now.

Then two and a half years ago an auto accident disc ruptures C-2/C-3, C-3/C-4 C-5/C-6 on the opposite side. I needed three rizotomey (sp) treatments to reduce the pain to manageable levels after the accident. Standing prescription now for Ultracet pain pills.

Both time I saw a chriopractor first and things got progressivly worse.

Are you losing strength in your hand or arm?

My suggestion is to stop the chrio and see a neurologist or pain management.

Texican_gal
03-11-2007, 03:22 PM
Might try a chiro who does ART active release technique. And they will give you exercises to do also.

http://www.activerelease.com/

You can even see an acupuncturist ....

unstpabl1
03-11-2007, 03:22 PM
Are you losing strength in your hand or arm?
.

No, Its all muscular, tension and knots. Thanks:)

LastManOut
03-11-2007, 03:29 PM
I had similar symptoms. An MRI will find any discs out of place.

Paco
03-11-2007, 05:14 PM
I'd start with getting into physical therapy for it first. I'm a little skeptical in general of the chiropractors who attribute all to bones, all bones no matter what you've got. Fortunately, in our area we have an exceptional chiroprator that has worked with multiple Div 1 NCAA and an NFL team that works the whole package.

I've got the chronic neck too from injuring neck muscles training in jujutsu in the early 90's. The earlier to work on resolution the way better.

Blaze N Colt
03-11-2007, 05:47 PM
Has anyone had any experience with decompression machines such as the DRX 9000 Spinal or the DRX 9500 Cervical Decompression machines?

dogfacedan
03-11-2007, 07:26 PM
What shoulder exercises are you doing? Dan

michael
03-11-2007, 07:29 PM
Has anyone had any experience with decompression machines such as the DRX 9000 Spinal or the DRX 9500 Cervical Decompression machines?

If that is the same as "Vax-D", I have. It cost me a lot of money and did absolutely nothing. Did I say it was worthless? It was worthless...caveat emptor.

georgel
03-11-2007, 07:48 PM
Go to a licensed massage therapist (LMT) who has experience in Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT) or trigger point technique.
Try this, check your scalenes. These are the three muscules that run down the side of your neck and disappear just behind the collar bone. Start a stretch by laying your head down like you're trying to lay your ear on your shoulder. Remember, this is a stretch, not a scrunch. The first stretch should be just enough to generate some tension, but not really a forcefull stretch. Hold for 10sec. Repeat on other side. This is just a warm up. Now, the second time you can go for a bit of stretch, again hold for at least 10 sec. Repeat a number of times increasing the stretch. After 5 or more reps. you can extend the stretch by extending the arm of the stretched side behind your back and grabbing it with the opposite hand to pull the stretch further.
See if this helps. Your mileage may vary. The scalenes are responsible for a multitude of referred pains from between the shoulder blades to the head and down the arms.

This provided for information only and is not a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis.

For the definitive do it yourself book on self help with muscle pain, get this book...


http://www.triggerpointbook.com/

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
03-12-2007, 03:12 AM
Good suggestions here, but allow me to offer the following alternative/additional approach:

Pain is a symptom. Its cause, IMHO usually is somewhere other than the location of the pain.

My self-taught sense of things is that the great majority (over 90%?) of people in the modern world sit so much (and far more than ever envisioned by our evolutionary history) that the hip flexors (psoas, ilio, quads) become tight and short and that our hip extensors (glutes, head of ham string that crosses hip joint, others) lose their ability to fire strongly and cleanly at the position of peak contraction (send the last inches home).

The net result is that the pelvis tend to tilt forward with attendant consequences in posture (hunching forward, shoulders rounding forward into internal rotation, head hangs in front of where it should be (ears should be above shoulders) all of which then cause muscles in the upper back/neck to overwork.

If this diagnosis is correct, then release of these muscles will only offer temporary relief.

unstpabl1
03-12-2007, 05:59 AM
The net result is that the pelvis tend to tilt forward with attendant consequences in posture (hunching forward, shoulders rounding forward into internal rotation, head hangs in front of where it should be (ears should be above shoulders) all of which then cause muscles in the upper back/neck to overwork.

If this diagnosis is correct, then release of these muscles will only offer temporary relief.

Marc,

after reading this, standing in the position described, I think I may know why I'm in this state at the moment. I took a MT classes, Then caddied,2 bags bad strap on one so had to hunch forward to keep the bag on shoulders for 4 hours about a week or so later. After the MT classes, 1st in years my hips were very sore, for weeks. The tension headache started a few days after the mt classes and lasted a week till I went to the chiro. The adjustment cleaned it up. Then i caddied and hips hurt which was unusual and my back was very sore after also unusual.

My question if you get time is Do i rehab this with some sort of Myo facial release with a foam roller or stretches, mat pilates ? T nation has a great pictorial on the myo facial. Do you have any recommendations/ program or resources for me to use as a plan of attack? I appreciate the help as I know you get a ton of emails and such a day
Thanks
mike

unstpabl1
03-12-2007, 06:04 AM
What shoulder exercises are you doing? Dan

Dan,
recent was kickboxing, but mil presses, lat pull downs were tightening it. Nothing exotic or behind the neck. Thanks:D

Hey Guys, i appreciate all the help. My chiro does the deep tissue and is good/. I'm looking for a plan of attack, things I can do to get my body in balance/ to repair it.

That stretch ear to shoulder helps alot.

Thank You
mike

Ride4TheBrand
03-12-2007, 05:58 PM
I went to the Doc's years ago when I had muscular knotting behind/around my shoulder blade. I couldn't do anything when the thing flared up.

She took an Xray, then scheduled me for an MRI. Long story short, I have a herniated disc in my neck which is pinching nerves and radiates out to the muscles.

I didn't even know I had this problem, but the MRI made it very evident. Don't rule this possibility out.

Blaze N Colt
03-12-2007, 08:49 PM
What shoulder exercises are you doing? Dan

I should explain: My problem is lower back pain which has extended down my left leg. In the morning the pain is almost disabling. By stretching and use of cold packs I make it through the day. However my excercise routine has been greatly curtailed (no more racquetball or jogging). I have gone to two excellent chiropractors who have each exhausted their respective techniques. I am exploring the possibility of consulting an orthopedic surgeon who uses a decompression machine in lieu of surgery. However, funds are limited and this is not inexpensive. I would be interested to know if anyone has had experience with these either good or bad.

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
03-12-2007, 08:58 PM
Mike:

All the external help can be useful in breaking lose the logjam, but IMHO nothing will be solved until YOU reset the signals you are sending to your hips.

Do these:

1) stretch psoas, ilio, quads (adductor complex, IT band, gluteus medius also helpful) In addition to the usual for these roll all of these out with the medicine ball-- POWERFUL medicine this one! It will be quite intense at first but do daily.

2) work peak contraction of hamstring-glute nexus i.e. send the last inches home. Advanced postion: Send last inches home with knees bringing heels towards butt. Do this VERY slowly, back off before spasm hits!

3) lower back activation e.g. supermans (one leg; other leg; one arm; other arm; opposite arm & leg, other arm/leg; both arms and legs). AS you get better, graduate to dolphins (hyperextension bench with legs being raised and lowered instead of upper body)

4) Thoracic mobilization-- ask your chiro or a good trainer.

5) rotator cuff basics, esply teres minor and infraspinatus

I am self-taught. Only you are responsible for you. No suing me for no reason for nothing no how no way. You might want to show this to a qualified professional who, unlike me, has actually examined you.

TAC,
CD

unstpabl1
03-12-2007, 10:35 PM
[quote=Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny]Mike:

All the external help can be useful in breaking lose the logjam, but IMHO nothing will be solved until YOU reset the signals you are sending to your hips.

Sorry, I'm not sure what this means. Are you talking adjustments, mental:confused:


I am self-taught. Only you are responsible for you. No suing me for no reason for nothing no how no way. You might want to show this to a qualified professional who, unlike me, has actually examined you.

totally understood. I appreciate the help. Started working with the idea this morning, with excercises and stretches that i thought would help.
thanks
mike schoenfeld

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
03-12-2007, 10:48 PM
Mike:

Sorry for the lack of clarity.

"Breaking the logjam"= someone working on you, be it chiro or massage techniques.

"Signals , , , to the hips"= What I mean is that if you have a muscle that is tight it is because there is a place in your brain that it telling it to tighten. If you have a muscle that is slack/not firing, then the place in your brain that tells it to do its job is asleep on the job. Mind, breath, body are a trinity. When one of the three is not right, use the other two to put it right.

Blaze:

Again, my self-taught and patient unseen diagnosis is quite similar. My guess is that your psoas are so tight that they are generating substantial compression of the vertabrae in you lower back, especially where the spine, sacrum and pelvis come together. This pressure I'm guessing is pressing on your nerve which runs down your leg.

Again, the solution is what I already prescribed for Mike. In your case you may need someone really skillful is release techniques who also knows how to get at your psoas. If my diagnosis is correct, you should feel glorious relief. If so, work your way into the routine I described.

Again, only you are responsible for you, etc.

unstpabl1
03-12-2007, 11:17 PM
[quote=Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny]Mike:

Sorry for the lack of clarity.

"Breaking the logjam"= someone working on you, be it chiro or massage techniques.

"Signals , , , to the hips"= What I mean is that if you have a muscle that is tight it is because there is a place in your brain that it telling it to tighten. If you have a muscle that is slack/not firing, then the place in your brain that tells it to do its job is asleep on the job. Mind, breath, body are a trinity. When one of the three is not right, use the other two to put it right.

Thanks Marc:D I really apreciate it. I let you know how this comes out.

Sniper
03-12-2007, 11:25 PM
I do a deep tissue modality known as Zentherapy. We apply pressure known as triggerpoint which tells a tighten muscle to tighten further which it cannot do and so relaxes.

I am in Wisconsin but travel often. If anyone one cares to avail themselves to me, PM me and see if we can work things out (so to speak).

georgel
03-12-2007, 11:28 PM
Marc, what you are talking about falls under the catagory of movement therapies and structural integration. Check out Moshe Feldenkrais for example. The idea is that our bodies to develop faulty patterns that ingrain both physically and mentally. Once the body becomes inbalanced other faulty patterns develop.
A good NMT therapist will perform a postural evaluation and develop a plan to correct the body. But as you imply, this only half the story. We must also learn to move more correctly.
It's a bit more complex than that, but it's late...

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
03-13-2007, 06:20 AM
Agreed.

TAC,
CD

DonGlock26
03-18-2007, 07:47 AM
I had neck pain from hunching over a computer or driving a squad car. I found out that my neck ligaments had become loose from car accidents. I do neck exercises and the stronger muscles helped support the neck.

unstpabl1
03-19-2007, 10:27 PM
Update

Its interesting how tight my lower body is. I wouldn't have thought about it till Crafty mentioned it. When I stretch and play with some of the info he gave it helps alot. The tennis ball against the wall is amazing, though painful at first. There is other stuff I'm noticing but want to hang on till I'm sure of the results, but I think what I eat has an effect on this to a degree, though I have more questions than answers. I appreciate all the advice


mike:D

LastManOut
03-20-2007, 07:37 AM
This MAY help you.

http://www.warriortalk.com/showpost.php?p=275657&postcount=22

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
03-20-2007, 08:20 AM
Unstoppable:

I am glad it is helping you. If you do it more I suspect it will help you more :-)

TAC,
CD

TomFurman
03-20-2007, 10:55 AM
Marc's advice is excellent and I use and recommend the "Sphinx" to this day.

An interesting take on neutral spine mechanics is from the author of the article list on my blog.
http://physicalstrategies.blogspot.com/2007/03/why-you-are-squatting-wrong.html
She is a former Thai boxer and yoga instructor in addition to be degree'd a plenty. Her blog provides lots of compelling information. She even responds to the article I posted in the comments section. Worth a look.

--Tom

unstpabl1
03-22-2007, 12:56 PM
Thanks Tom, i enjoy your blog