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View Full Version : I don't feel 21 anymore , is this normal ?



Joseph Timbs
02-14-2007, 10:15 PM
I'm about to turn 30 later this year , and I have begun to drag @ss a lot more than I used to a couple of years ago . I simply don't the energy like I used to , but I'm not sure why .

I have had a lot of sinus problems , but I've also wondered if it's because I'm not in Tradoc with other hooah types or if it's because of a more personal issue ?

Maybe I'm making something out of nothing , and if I am , please pimp slap me . ;)

Thanks guys.

KravJeff
02-14-2007, 10:47 PM
30 was a tough one for me too ... I think it was because I felt, I don't know, grown up or like I had to be grown up (still tryin' to achieve that in a lot of ways ... :D ).

I'll be 38 in May - I have two young boys now; I coach their sports teams, lead their Scouts Dens, help at the school ... I have a great wife; I'm in the best physical shape I've been in since high school sports (primarily thanks to Krav Maga), I'm learning MMA and may even get into the ring eventually ... I have a decent career ...

I'm starting to learn that age is really a frame of mind, and that when I was young I tried too hard to grow up quickly. I'm old enough now (and maybe a little wiser) to realize that my best years aren't behind me, but are ahead - And I'm still young enough to have some good "old fashion" fun occasionally, and not seem like I'm grasping for my lost youth (although the hangovers are more painful and last longer than ever :rolleyes: ) ... You do slow down a bit as you get older. I'm convinced we're made that way to learn to enjoy it!

If you haven't already, find something physically / emotionally / spiritually / intellectually challenging (church and fighting with 20 year olds does the trick for me!) to stop "draggin' a$$" ... Keep yourself young at heart; and learn to enjoy going from Cowboy, to Warrior, to Lover, to King ...

Take it easy on yourself - Here's your friendly pimp slap! ;)

Paco
02-14-2007, 11:33 PM
Dude, keep it tight on the diet and exercise discipline. You'll thank youself in 20 years. I'm just a half year short of 50 and I've JUST started to feel a bit stiffer and slower. I'm hitting it harder this year. 30 is just a kid. Fired Up? Fired up.

Cold War Scout
02-15-2007, 04:38 AM
Pulling Against Time
Athletes Perform Faster, Higher, Stronger -- Until Age Catches Up With Them. But Training Can Curb the Inevitable Decline.

By David Brown
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, February 13, 2007; HE01

When Bob Kaehler tried out for the U.S. Olympic Rowing Team in 2004, he wanted just once more to feel the elation of flying across the water at 32 feet per second, nine human bodies and a boat fused into a perfect expression of power, balance and timing.
He'd made the team in 1992, 1996 and 2000, but he knew this time he was up against long odds. He had a family, a business, not quite enough time and a 39-year-old body. In his favor were experience, technical skill and a thing called "boat-moving ability."
He didn't make it.
As he looks back, he says there were lots of reasons. His body was just one of them, and perhaps not even the biggest one. But things were different.
"It is hard to say where my physiology really was. It was not where it needed to be. It probably would never have been where it was in 1996," Kaehler, who is 42, said last week. "When you are older, you need to get back in the game sooner. It is doable. But I would have probably needed 18 months, not six months or eight months."
Athletic performance declines with age -- it's the one other thing that's inevitable besides death and taxes. But how does that happen? What is it that slips? And why is it that, sooner or later, when you try to roll the rock of physical conditioning up the hill, you can't get it as high as you once could?
Those are questions all world-class athletes ask when they unwillingly clean out their lockers for the last time. For others -- those who retire before they have to -- it comes later. For Mike Teti, the 50-year-old head coach of the U.S. men's rowing team and a three-time Olympian, it came all at once, on a day in 2000 he still remembers clearly.
The team had a rare day off, and Teti took his newspaper to a coffee shop in Princeton, N.J., to relax. He opened it and couldn't read the print. He went to the boathouse to work out on a power-measuring machine called an ergometer. He had the worst scores he'd ever seen. Getting dressed to go home, he noticed his pants were tight.
"For me, everything happened at once. Almost overnight. And you say, 'Oh my God, I'm over the hill.' "
Kaehler and Teti have long since come to terms with the fact they will never again be the athletes they were. Kaehler, who lives in Holland, Pa., is a physical therapist and runs a coaching business on the side called RedLine Maximum Fitness. ("As in redlining an engine," he says tellingly). Teti exercises to stay fit ("and to eat") and helps bring other rowers to the sweet spot where body, mind and opportunity can win races.
To understand why the decline of athletic performance is inevitable with aging -- and why it is partially reversible at any age -- requires a little knowledge of exercise physiology. (Don't worry, it's worth it.)
Sports that combine strength and endurance -- rowing is perhaps the best example -- are enterprises that in many ways come down to one basic task: finding a way to deliver the most oxygen to muscles as fast as possible.
Oxygen is part of the fuel that allows muscle tissue to produce mechanical energy -- to contract, in a word. Glucose (a form of sugar) or fat are the other necessary fuels. Muscles can work for short periods without oxygen -- so-called anaerobic respiration. But for sustained, long-term exertion, there is no substitute for oxygen. None.
Oxygen is carried in the blood, principally attached to hemoglobin in red blood cells but also dissolved in the blood's water, or plasma. It is put into the blood by the lungs, which are basically an elaborate mechanism for exposing an extremely thin layer of blood to air. Once it reaches muscle cells, oxygen is taken up by mitochondria, a vast archipelago of microscopic power plants floating in each cell's inland sea.
When a person commences athletic conditioning, the demand for oxygen goes up. Muscles want more oxygen as fuel. The number of muscle cells increases, and the cells already present get bigger. The number of mitochondria in each cell also goes up, in some cases dramatically. For oarsmen and marathoners, it can double.
The body's capacity to use oxygen is measurable. It's called "oxygen uptake," is designated "VO2" and is reported as the liters of gas absorbed per minute through breathing. When people train, their VO2goes up; when they become sedentary, it goes down.
But there's a limit -- maximum oxygen uptake, or VO2max. A rower or runner might enhance performance beyond that point through extraordinary effort, but the extra speed won't come from oxygen-based energy. It will require anaerobic respiration -- a process that produces lactic acid, makes muscles feel as if they're on fire, and can't be sustained for long.
Training not only raises VO2max, it also dramatically increases the level of exertion a person can sustain for long periods. This is something sedentary people realize when they try to keep up with their fit friends over a mile and not just 100 yards. Trained athletes can function at 87 percent of their VO2max for an hour and then 83 percent for a second hour. For the untrained, it is 50 percent the first hour and 35 percent the second.
In theory, many things could determine VO2max, but in practice one thing predominates -- the heart's ability to move oxygen-rich blood around the body. That is far more important than, say, the lungs' ability to put oxygen into the blood or the muscles' ability to take it out.
Endurance training enhances blood delivery in several ways. The distribution system improves; blood vessels get wider; and the number of capillaries in muscle tissue goes up. But again, one variable predominates -- it's the heart's pumping capacity, the volume of blood it can move per minute.
Training can raise this so-called cardiac output from a maximum of about 6.6 gallons per minute in an untrained person to about 10.6 gallons in a highly fit athlete. The heart achieves this by beating faster, filling fuller after each beat and squeezing harder.
And it is all those capacities (and more) that decline with age.
Maximum heart rate declines about 5 percent per decade as the heart becomes less responsive to the adrenaline-like hormones that whip it into action. VO2max declines 6 to 10 percent per decade after age 25, and this accelerates to 15 percent per decade after age 60.
At the receiving end, muscle strength declines 10 to 15 percent per decade starting at about age 30. This is because there is an actual loss of muscle fibers (and the nerves that drive them), and because some fibers usually used to generate brief bursts of power are transformed to longer-acting endurance fibers -- a change that reduces strength overall. By age 70, a person is only half as strong as he or she was in youth.
While the performance of nearly all the body's physiological variables goes down with age, the decrement in athletic performance depends on the sport and the athlete's baseline fitness and skill. Exercise physiologists have studied this for many sports and come up with many interesting observations.
One study looked at the top 10 performances for four different length races run by U.S. Masters Swimming in 1976, 1986 and 1996. Masters are amateur swimmers, all older than 18 but most in their 30s, 40s and 50s, who race against one another in five-year age groups. Nearly all the times were faster in 1986 than in 1976; and in 1996 more than half were faster than they had been in 1986. Interestingly, the average age at which finishing times began to rise -- a sign that the swimmers had passed their peak performance -- went from 33 in 1976 to 40 in 1996.
Conclusion: The whole population of adult competitive swimmers is getting faster, and the average swimmer is staying fast longer.
Other studies looked at football and baseball, sports in which cardiovascular fitness is less important to overall performance than it is in such activities as swimming. Age makes little difference in the performance of punters in the National Football League, but the passing success of quarterbacks improves significantly between ages 22 and 26. For professional baseball players, the number of hits a batter gets and the number of strikeouts a pitcher gets both peak at age 27. But the percentage of times a player walks peaks at 30, fielding percentage peaks at 31, and the earned run average (ERA) for pitchers peaks at 29.
Conclusion: Experience and practice counts (even if you're really good) and can make up for loss of strength.
A study of triathletes in their 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s competing in a half-Ironman race found that performance for each part of the event (swimming, biking, running) declined at roughly the same rate in each age group. A study of weightlifters showed that upper-body strength (measured by the bench press) declined at the same rate as lower-body strength (the squat).
Conclusion: No part of your body is spared the effects of age. So exercise it all.
That last piece of advice is the thing that falls out of the vast, detailed understanding of exercise physiology of the past 90 years. Aerobic capacity and muscle strength can be improved with exercise even when people are in their 80s.
Peak performance for most sports may occur in a person's 20s or early 30s, but "in terms of the trainability of the tissue, that seems to be maintained even when the person has another 50 years on their bones," said Edward T. Howley, a physiologist and exercise researcher at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. "It's never too late to start an exercise program."

Cold War Scout
02-15-2007, 04:40 AM
Still, the fact that it may be too late to win a race is a hard thing to accept. Especially if you are used to winning races.
Every Thanksgiving morning, Mike Teti, the Olympic rowing coach, runs a cross-country race with members of the Schuylkill Navy, a group of people affiliated with the clubs along Philadelphia's famous Boathouse Row.
The race has been run since 1899, and the field is always fast. Teti has won it nine times, more than anyone else. His best time over six miles was 29:55. Now he comes in at 35 or 36 minutes.
"We remember what we could do. I remember that I could run 5:30 miles. We think we can do it because we could 10 years ago, and we just can't," he said wistfully last week.
Two years ago, he reached another milestone in the Thanksgiving run. A woman beat him.
"Not," he adds after a pause, "that there's anything wrong with that." ∑

sjc3081
02-15-2007, 04:46 AM
It could be a medical problem. I started to feel exhausted at 21 and went to doctors and they found nothing wrong. Than I girlfreind who was a nursing student matter of factly stated I had Sleep Apnea. She was right. I am being treated and I'm back to 100%.

Texican_gal
02-15-2007, 07:27 AM
ak74auto said: "I have had a lot of sinus problems ...

I'm thinking this is the problem. At one time I had a never-go-away-completely sinus problem, and I felt AWFUL. Less energy, dopey, disconnected.

Please investigate this further .... :)

And avoid someone who only wants to stuff you with antibiotics.

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
02-15-2007, 08:23 AM
30? You poor baby! :p Come look me up in 24 years! :p :D

Joseph Timbs
02-15-2007, 09:10 AM
ak74auto said: "I have had a lot of sinus problems ...

I'm thinking this is the problem. At one time I had a never-go-away-completely sinus problem, and I felt AWFUL. Less energy, dopey, disconnected.

Please investigate this further .... :)

And avoid someone who only wants to stuff you with antibiotics.

I have had quite a few infections since coming back from Bragg , plus my wife says I stop breathing in my sleep sometimes , so ... It might be time vist the Doc again . Damn , I hate visiting DR's almost as much I hate paperwork . lol

Joseph Timbs
02-15-2007, 09:12 AM
30? You poor baby! :p Come look me up in 24 years! :p :D

I love you too , in a non gay way of course. :p

John McCreery
02-15-2007, 12:11 PM
I had very similar situation at 32, started to drag, my head hurt, couldn't concentrate. Turned out I was diabetic. As long as I keep my sugar/carbs in check I feel pretty good. Might want to get a quick check up.

Treyarch
02-15-2007, 12:22 PM
I'm 28 and will forever be as old as I feel...and right now I feel as fresh as a 3 month old corpse.

dgg9
02-15-2007, 12:30 PM
I have had a lot of sinus problems ,

IMO, the reason you decline with age is that your sleep becomes shallower and poorer. At 22, you sleep completely through the night. At 42, you're up and going to the bathroom more often at night.

Since you mention sinus, it's possible that's interfering with your sleep.

Texican_gal
02-15-2007, 01:07 PM
IMO, the reason you decline with age is that your sleep becomes shallower and poorer. At 22, you sleep completely through the night. At 42, you're up and going to the bathroom more often at night.

Since you mention sinus, it's possible that's interfering with your sleep.

Good point, dgg9. The importance of sleep is overlooked, I think.

Here's a story: A friend of mine had UNDIAGNOSED Parkinson's for several years, and also just learned that she "has never gone to sleep properly" or something like that. In a sleep clinic she was told she is waking up 32 times an hour. She doesn't remember these "wakings."

She is on dopamine, and the doc told her that her now "more normal" sleep would actually be the best thing for her condition.

Polar11
02-15-2007, 01:34 PM
+1 Krav Jeff

It's all a state of mind; physical well being I'm convinced is more an issue of whats happening between the ears, that and a goal worth pursuing.

Clean your guns & repost in the morning and let us know how you're feeling.

Manwell
02-15-2007, 02:05 PM
At 47 Iím still feeling pretty dang good. I exercise and feel good almost every day and if I watch the wine consumption I typically feel even better. I stay very active with both business and personal activitiesÖ pretty much always on the go. I donít really have time to feel or be tired. Iím early to bed and to rise most every day, maintaining my schedule. I operate best with 7 to 8 hours of sleep every night, so thatís what I shoot for. Go to your doctor and get a complete physical including blood workÖ if all looks good, step it up a notch or two! Watch what you eatÖ

Manwell

michael
02-15-2007, 03:08 PM
I'll be 47 in August, and feel good except for a few nagging joint and back problems. They won't get better as they are structural, but I do pretty good working around them most of the time. Other than that, I feel great. Fitness is a lifetime journey, and it changes as we age but is something every warrior must pursue if he wants to be the complete package and ultimate nightmare for Hadji.

sjc3081
02-15-2007, 03:11 PM
I have had quite a few infections since coming back from Bragg , plus my wife says I stop breathing in my sleep sometimes.

Bingo, Sleep Apnea. Stop breathing in your sleep equals sleep apnea. Ask your Doctor for a sleep study test. What happens is when you sleep you stop breathing, when your O2 level drops your body wakes you ,so you breath, you don't even know this is happening. Than the process repeats itself all night long. You cant get REM sleep and you are always exhausted. Allergies, acid reflux ,waking up gasping for air and morning headaches are some of the symtoms. I have been treated with a CPAP for 10 years now and it has saved my life.

Blackbear
02-15-2007, 03:25 PM
O to be 30 again....

Ammo Lab
02-15-2007, 06:18 PM
At 40 now I really feel it when I do not get to the gym regularly. Miss two weeks and put on 10lbs...:rolleyes: I was sleeping really poorly for months and we picked up a tempurpedic foam mattress for a bazillion $ and I slept like a baby for two months, now that it has broken in a little I was thinking it was the mattress, it ended up being our pillows.

Guantes
02-15-2007, 09:29 PM
Once you pass abut 35 what you are doing is fighting a delaying action. Your goal is delaying loss of strength, reduction of endurance, loss of speed and susceptibility to injuries. Those things are inevitable, but you can reduce and delay their progress. A lifestyle program that involves diet, exercise, stretching, rest and relaxation wil be of great assistance in the endeavor.

I am not as stong as I used to be, I don't have the endurance I used to, I'm not as fast, been lucky I've had relatively few injuries. I still believe fighting the inevitable is worth it. I weigh the same as I did forty years ago working the streets, I can still do fifty pushups in two minutes and I can bend over and put my head on my knees standing up. I'll be 65 in a little over a month.

kabar
02-15-2007, 09:56 PM
You might ask your doc for a referral to a good ENT specialist. I understand that the Mayo Clinic has discovered that a lot of people with chronic sinusitis symptoms actually have a fungal infection that will not respond to antibiotics.

Joseph Timbs
02-16-2007, 05:27 AM
Once you pass abut 35 what you are doing is fighting a delaying action. Your goal is delaying loss of strength, reduction of endurance, loss of speed and susceptibility to injuries. Those things are inevitable, but you can reduce and delay their progress. A lifestyle program that involves diet, exercise, stretching, rest and relaxation wil be of great assistance in the endeavor.



I expect a certain decline in testosterone at 35 and there after , but I'm just turning 30 . I honestly think I need to go the sleep tests route and see what happens .

As for PT , I have to stay in at least decent shape .

alex v
02-16-2007, 07:04 AM
At 48 I'm in much better shape than when I was 30. And I sure as hell do not miss the hangovers of my misspent youth. No ,its not rationalization: at 48 I make more money, its easier to get laid, I feel better, I perform better, car insurance is cheaper. Whats not to like about it?
Alex

Alex1
02-16-2007, 08:15 AM
I also have problems sleeping - what is the best way to improve sleep, esp. if you have apnea?

dgg9
02-16-2007, 08:43 AM
I also have problems sleeping - what is the best way to improve sleep, esp. if you have apnea?

1. Get a real diagnosis.
2. If apnea confirmed, get a CPAP machine.

Invisible man
02-16-2007, 11:19 AM
I will be 39 and really hope by the time I am 50 the technology will exist to cut my head off and put it on a brand new body:D . O yea and guess what, wifey will having a baby soon. Pretty good for having a vasectomey 9 years ago! I still got it baby!

Elkhunter
03-02-2007, 12:40 PM
Sleep problems are very common and definately relate to fatigue during the day. You need a solid 8 hours of good sleep a night.

Get a hygrometer and check the humidy in your home.

If it is above 50% anytime through the year you probably have dust mites. A common problem from dust mites is constant sinus and upper respitoray infections.

Read up on that to learn to deal with it.

Also go to your drug store and look in the sinus and cold section and get some nasal strips, they help ALOT.

Speaking from experience, Im sleeping better than I have in ten years.

Also get rid of coffee, soda pop and anything with refined sugar, which includes bottled juice.

30 is your peak, you shouldnt feel like crap. Getting older doesnt have to be bad if you take care of yourself.

Gerald Bailey
03-13-2007, 01:30 AM
I really enjoy getting older, wisdom sets in and craftyness overtakes you. A belssing in my life is that my wife is in the health industry, check out your diet, avoid GM wheat, dairy, (sinus clugger upper) and unnatuarl sugar. Limit you quality coffee intake to two per day and start on very good quality suppament. Get onto Mannatech's Ambratose, glyconutrient and anti oxidents. Look into the blood group diet. At 34 I did some refresher training with the south african navy divers, they were averaging 23, I left them behind !!!
Drink your gallon of good quality H2O per day

If you think I am talking trash, we'll chat when you are 50 and can't egt out of bed.

Give it a go

Gerald
gerald@wolverineqtg.com




I'm about to turn 30 later this year , and I have begun to drag @ss a lot more than I used to a couple of years ago . I simply don't the energy like I used to , but I'm not sure why .

I have had a lot of sinus problems , but I've also wondered if it's because I'm not in Tradoc with other hooah types or if it's because of a more personal issue ?

Maybe I'm making something out of nothing , and if I am , please pimp slap me . ;)

Thanks guys.

KravJeff
03-24-2007, 01:02 AM
1. Get a real diagnosis.
2. If apnea confirmed, get a CPAP machine.

There's also a new FDA approved pillow that helps w/sleep apnea called the Sona pillow www.sonapillow.com (http://www.sonapillow.com)

Good luck!

Ragsbo
03-24-2007, 04:27 AM
First get a complete physical and have them check out the sinus troubles. Then get serious on the diet and my advice is to cut out caffeine as much as possible so you can sleep better. I know it really effects me.