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Cold War Scout
02-13-2007, 10:46 AM
I was watching track practice yesterday at a major university in the ACC conference. Specifically the sprinters and hurdlers. Anybody who watches track meets knows that in the short sprints, especially the indoor season events of 60 meters, if you do not explode off the blocks, the chances of you winning are extremely remote. In the 60, probably as in gunfights, you simply cannot catch up if your start is not superb. In sprinting, as in armed encounters, you don't get to go until somebody else has set in motion the condition precedent.

Anyway the coach cut off what appeared to be about 4 foot lengths of rubber banding from a roll. He had one team member line up behind the member who was going to practice a sprint, wrap the band around the runner's waist, and then hold each end firmly. When the runner took off he/she was only able to take maybe half a step before the resistance of the band kicked in. The runner would furiously try to plow ahead for about 5 meters giving it all he/she had, while the team member holding the band let out some of the slack by taking a few walking steps with the runner. Then the team member holding the band would suddenly let it go altogether at which point the runner would explode down the track.

This drill is designed to help explode and accelerate out of the block by training with resistance those muscles specifically used in that movement.

Speaking to the coach on the side during the 2 hours I got to observe practice, he also told me how he has them do a lot of "strength training" with other than traditional weights. They do "strength training" every day they train, but they only work out with weights twice a week. The other days they use medicine balls and bands. He also places great emphasis on training of the core, not just primarily his runners legs.

MDTS
02-13-2007, 11:55 AM
Excellent observations CWS. Interesting how many sports are adopting the "strength training" methodology now as compared to when I was younger.

Observing sports like this and watching football players run dynamic directional change drills are good lessons and speak to the necessity for this type of movement conditioning in weapons based environs. You cannot out run a bullet but you sure can mess with someone OODA loop by getting off the "X" aggressively whilst accessing your tools making your enemies job harder.

This is a skill that applies accross the spectrum of fighting and is not limited to gunfights. When confronted by a single opponent with a contact weapon or when confronted by multiple opponents empty handed or armed, an aggressive take off can propel you toward a flank and make your opponent have to play catch up.

crebralfix
02-13-2007, 12:18 PM
That's very interesting and VERY useful. Now, combine that with the false lead and we may have something.

Has the notion of "shock" been explored in terms of using the dog catcher? When does too much force mess up the dog catcher?

Cold War Scout
02-13-2007, 12:23 PM
That's very interesting and VERY useful. Now, combine that with the false lead and we may have something.

Has the notion of "shock" been explored in terms of using the dog catcher? When does too much force mess up the dog catcher?

My own sense is that the more dynamically you place it, the more likely you are to get the adverasry's arm going backwards from his torso in such a way that his balance and his arm strength/arm's ability to recover for followup shots are more compromised. If you can get his arm back AND get your head butt in, it really makes a structural difference.

hiflyer51
02-13-2007, 01:24 PM
After starting to do FOF training I realized that I needed to do some training specific to moving off the X dynamically. My regular training regime is aerobic training 5 days a week in the form of running 2 to 4 miles, and progressive weight training 2 days a week. My weight training is primarily basic exercises: squats, rows, bench press, pull downs, seated military presses, lunges and ab exercises.

The training I do specifically to improve moving off the X is short sprints, usually only 5 to 15 yards. In particular, I emphazise improving my acceleration during the first few steps. I try to do 10 to 20 of these short sprints daily. I normally do these is street clothes, and I practice my draw while I do them.

MDTS
02-13-2007, 01:47 PM
Hiflyer- now set a cone at the halfway point of your short sprint. Start walking toward cone and then break hard to the left or right around cone while drawing. Then repeat from a slow jog and eventually integrate into your sprint. Go slow as the knees need to get used to the hard angles when moving dynamicly.

hiflyer51
02-13-2007, 02:53 PM
MDTS those are good points! I do sometimes incorporate the hard break left or right in my sprints after 3 or 4 strides to simulate the direction change required to try to get to BG's flank.

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
02-13-2007, 04:03 PM
Woof All:

Excellent observations CWS http://dogbrothers.com/wrapper.php?file=boardofadvisors.html (see the third picture).

It is for similar reasons that I work with Chris Gizzi (former standout linebacker for the Green Bay Packers and currently a trainer to many NFL and other profressional athletes) both for myself as an athlete and in development of the footwork skills for called for by the Suarez gunfighting paradigm and the Dog Brothers KF/DC paradigm which blend into The Interface Paradigm of gun, knife and empty hand. (Chris can be seen in our "Kali Tudo" DVD and with me in my cover piece in Black Belt by the way)

More than once in my life I have been truly blessed to stumble across the right person at the right time and Chris is so right for this mission in so many ways , , ,

The Adventure continues,
Crafty Dog

Cold War Scout
03-01-2007, 08:08 AM
I recently bought one of those inflated balance/core discs, and have been using it throughout the day for about a week now. I swear my knees and ankles feel stronger and more structurally solid than they did a week ago. I sense that this can only be good for explosive power.

atrox_vis
03-01-2007, 08:22 AM
I have a couple of football players that I am training for the Nike Combine and some of the drills involve change of direction & work from the start of a sprint or stance. However, while linear drills are good you should throw some Angled, lateral, backwards, and band sprint start Drills.
One of my favorite drills is to have the trainee sprint a quarter of a mile and then hook into a launch speed trainer. First do 10 forward running drag & release drills, then sprint a quarter mile. Hook back in for backpedaling capabilities, then have them take ten steps backward under drag & then release, make them spin around and sprint 10 steps. Repeat with side movements and angled movements. All in all, they will sprint about 10 x 400 Meters and 100 individual launch speed repititions.
I imagine this would fit the bill for "getting off the X" training.

BadKarma
03-01-2007, 12:14 PM
I use harness/band drills as well.

do any of you guys who are doing professional training have your own websites?

Cold War Scout
03-01-2007, 12:17 PM
www.teamruthless.com (http://www.teamruthless.com)

BadKarma
03-01-2007, 12:57 PM
www.teamruthless.com (http://www.teamruthless.com)

You own that, or contract as a trainer, or what?

Cold War Scout
03-01-2007, 12:58 PM
You own that, or contract as a trainer, or what?

Oh no, no, no. I don't own that nor work there. Sorry if I responded incorrectly.

Member atrox_vis owns Team Ruthless. His training facility is The Warriors Forge in Manassas, Va.

BadKarma
03-01-2007, 01:10 PM
I must have misunderstood.

Looks like a nice facility. The Contact page indicated it wasn't open yet, but there is a SI course scheduled for saturday.

MTS
03-01-2007, 02:07 PM
I must have misunderstood.

Looks like a nice facility. The Contact page indicated it wasn't open yet, but there is a SI course scheduled for saturday.

It's up and running, I took an AMOK! class from Tom Sotis there in December.

atrox_vis
03-01-2007, 02:45 PM
We are up & running, we just have not had our grand opening yet.

mr. right-wing
03-01-2007, 07:34 PM
I used to do the same things with bungee cords in wrestling, worked really well.

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
03-03-2007, 09:21 PM
Woof Speedy:

Thanks for noticing the human element here.

Yes Giz did get hurt-- a back injury. While there he was highly regarded-- indeed he was the man chosen by the team to lead them onto the field carrying the American flag for the first game after 911. A foto of that moment appears in the credits of our "Kali Tudo" DVD, in which he appeared. Perhaps it is because he is a friend, but when I look at that picture, I feel chills. What a powerful moment that must have been for him!

When I met him he was in training for a return to the NFL. He didn't quite make it, and now trains players for the combines (I've met and interacted with a few), and various amateur and pro-athletes.

He trained with me for the better part of two years and now he trains me in what he calls "readiness" training. Extraordinary trainer! I've been around a while now, but learn something new every session with him-- not only physically, but also pyschologically.

TAC,
CD

PS: By the way folks, I will be at Team Ruthless in two weeks. Hope to see lots of you there!

atrox_vis
03-07-2007, 10:36 AM
I think that one of the prime movers in "getting off the X" is an individual's abililty to activate as much red "fast twitch" muscle fiber as possible on demand. Some of that ability is in your genetic predisposition, however I think a good bit can be achieved by fast twitch activation through proper training. I have 2 short clips that I made yesterday to illistrate my point. The first clip I want you to watch is of my newest trainer & convert to cambatives Erin Neumann. She has been training with me for about 9 months & she is going to demonstrate the proper "explosive" technique in 3 basic exercises.
http://www.teamruthless.com/000_0323.MOV
The second clip is of Ashley doing a compound plyometric bodyweight movement.
http://www.teamruthless.com/100_1123.MOV
What I want you to notice is where the power to explode comes from. It is the same place that it is going to have to come from to "get off the X".
It applies to any transfer of power for movement or impact & it also applies to any direction that you have to move.

Cold War Scout
03-07-2007, 07:01 PM
Ultimately one must practice the movements themselves. Regardless of how much general conditioning one does, eventually a hurdler must hit the hurdles, a boxer must box, a hitter must swing the bat at an incoming ball.

The majority of the best footwork drills I have seen to date come from the Dog Brothers system. I have learned some others from Tom Sotis and Bob Orlando, but the majority are from the Dog Brothers.

hiflyer51
03-07-2007, 08:17 PM
Ultimately one must practice the movements themselves. Regardless of how much general conditioning one does, eventually a hurdler must hit the hurdles, a boxer must box, a hitter must swing the bat at an incoming ball..

+1 All the speed in the world will not help much unless you can draw your weapon fast and consistently as you are moving off the X.

atrox_vis
03-08-2007, 12:32 AM
True enough, but from what I am seeing in the way most people train is that they are not training the body's ability to be able to access fast twich movement. I am saying that if you are going to train for conditioning purposes, do things that are going to maximize your ability to move off the X & not hinder it. Skills training is still the only way to get better and more efficient, however proper conditioning training will give you the ability to employ your skills with more confidence and speed. Or do you think that there is no correlation in the manner in which you trian your body and the way it reacts under stress? A boxer does not just throw punches, he uses assistance training to further hone his ability to do his chosen skill set better.

michael
03-08-2007, 03:13 AM
Dino, could you post a few simple drills that we can use that require little to no equipment? I like the ones in the video's. Thanks!

Cold War Scout
03-08-2007, 06:44 AM
I believe we must be doing the general physical training. I believe all my prior posts, as well as the starting of this thread, support that contention. I don't think anything in my post remotely suggests otherwise. All I am saying is that in addition to the general physical training we should be adding in practice of the very skill we are trying to improve.

I think it was Top Dog (the best Dog Brothers fighter in his day) who said words to the effect, after swinging metal pipes for an arm strengthening workout, "always end your practice swinging the rattan sticks that you will actually be using in a fight."

peregrine
03-08-2007, 08:36 AM
Jumping rope is the easiest way to train the explosiveness and muscles to GETOFFTHEX.

Cold War Scout
03-08-2007, 08:40 AM
Jumping rope is the easiest way to train the explosiveness and muscles to GETOFFTHEX.

Old school seems so uncomplicated, yet still ever so valuable.

skyguy
03-08-2007, 09:08 AM
Train your white fast-twitch muscle with basic moves. This is where explosive power comes from.

Traditional squat: weight about 75% of one's body weight, thighs at least parallel to ground. 2x10
Jump squats: No weights. Neurological training. Trains and coordinates nervous system/leg muscles for explosive moves. 2x10-20

Then just practice 'off the x' variations again and again and again........
.

atrox_vis
03-08-2007, 09:51 AM
Jump Suats & Jump Rope are a valuable addition to a conditioning program, however how does that help you if by chance you are in a prone position and have to get up & off the X? I believe all avenues need to be explored. Example, wear your weapon, start from the prone, face down position, and explode "Burpee Style" to your feet, & as soon as your feet hit the ground explode in any direction designated by a coach while drawing and firing.
You can't be sure about what situation you will be in if and when something occurs. Why leave those holes in your training, we did not when Tom Sotis was running us through AMOK! drills in which we started from the ground. There is no one answer and as long as you are not going to get stuck in the one size fits all mentality there can be progress.

Cold War Scout
03-08-2007, 09:54 AM
Jump Suats & Jump Rope are a valuable addition to a conditioning program, however how does that help you if by chance you are in a prone position and have to get up & off the X? I believe all avenues need to be explored. Example, wear your weapon, start from the prone, face down position, and explode "Burpee Style" to your feet, & as soon as your feet hit the ground explode in any direction designated by a coach while drawing and firing.
You can't be sure about what situation you will be in if and when something occurs. Why leave those holes in your training, we did not when Tom Sotis was running us through AMOK! drills in which we started from the ground. There is no one answer and as long as you are not going to get stuck in the one size fits all mentality there can be progress.

Good points.

skyguy
03-08-2007, 11:38 AM
however how does that help you if by chance you are in a prone position and have to get up & off the X?
Not to argue, but if one is 'ever' in the prone position in a confrontation, he's pretty much the aggressor's meat. It's really hard to avoid a bullet, knife, club or feet when down there.

But, I suppose it is worth a bit of attention for worst case, survival scenarios.
.

Cold War Scout
03-08-2007, 11:44 AM
Not to argue, but if one is 'ever' in the prone position in a confrontation, he's pretty much the aggressor's meat. It's really hard to avoid a bullet, knife, club or feet when down there.

But, I suppose it is worth a bit of attention for worst case, survival scenarios.
.

In AMOK! training we had to spar from the floor against a guy who was on his feet. One can represent pretty decently from the ground until (if ever) the opportunity to get up on your feet presents itself. The more athletic you are, the more possible representing and getting to your feet are.

atrox_vis
03-08-2007, 01:29 PM
In the long & short of it, everybody is going to have their own opinions about this subject. What I have outlined in my posts is how we do it. It is not for everybody, but I will continue to post my thoughts and methodologies for those who are interested in combining superior footwork (Dog Bros.) & superior weapons skills (AMOK! & Suarez) with a conditioning program that will help you maximize your body's ability take those skill sets to a new level. If you are interested in that, try our stuff out and if not, that's OK too.

skyguy
03-08-2007, 02:37 PM
IMO.......fighting from the prone (face down) is survivable if it's empty hand/foot stuff. You can cover, jump up and run. (maybe)
An aggressor with a weapon changes the dynamic considerably.

I've spent enough time on my face with my opponent having my back. It's a trip and near impossible to fight off a gun, knife or club....even in slow motion.

But hey, I still like to learn.
.