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sfc
01-25-2019, 11:11 AM
What do you like to use for your truck gun bag?

Greg Nichols
01-25-2019, 11:31 AM
Do you mean a support bag, storage of the weapon, or both?

sfc
01-25-2019, 11:39 AM
Mostly storage for when I'm in the vehicle. So something gray that isn't going to draw attention and allows for relatively quick deployment.

Greg Nichols
01-25-2019, 11:50 AM
I use a backpack with a padded laptop pocket in a color that closely matches my vehicle's interior so it doesn't stand out. Most people just assume it's my gym bag when I carry it to and from the car. But then again I look like I go to the gym.

62-10
01-25-2019, 12:15 PM
OP - what is it to contain?

sfc
01-25-2019, 12:17 PM
Micro Draco with folding arm brace. About 15 inches overall.

sfc
01-25-2019, 01:27 PM
This what I've temporarily come up with...


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Sleestak
01-25-2019, 02:04 PM
Looks good to me.

sfc
01-25-2019, 02:14 PM
I will say that the red dot is hooking on the bag on the way out. It's not anything that couldn't be dealt with quickly, but it did get me thinking a straight "up pull", like out of a duffel bag, would remove that problem. I've decided to not have one in the pipe. That was a back and forth decision since I definitely keep one in the pipe on my carry, but in the end that's what I decided.

BTW, that's a 4 mag pouch that I have turned around so the gun doesn't hook, but I also will hopefully be able to have enough to solve any problem that needs a solution I come across.

Brent Yamamoto
01-25-2019, 02:25 PM
I will say that the red dot is hooking on the bag on the way out. It's not anything that couldn't be dealt with quickly, but it did get me thinking a straight "up pull", like out of a duffel bag, would remove that problem. I've decided to not have one in the pipe. That was a back and forth decision since I definitely keep one in the pipe on my carry, but in the end that's what I decided.

BTW, that's a 4 mag pouch that I have turned around so the gun doesn't hook, but I also will hopefully be able to have enough to solve any problem that needs a solution I come across.

If you can upgrade the mount for your red dot it will lower the profile a great deal. There are solutions that allow for cowitnessing the dot and BUIS, which is of course ideal. But the side benefit for carrying in your bag is that it's less likely to snag on the way out of a bag.

If a gun is not under my direct control, such as in my hands or in a holster, my default is empty chamber.

A gun in the bag - always, always always, empty chamber. Bedside SMG - empty chamber. Truck gun - empty chamber.

There are a few exceptions. I have a kydex holster mounted on the bed. No one is going to disturb it and the trigger is well protected. I keep that one chambered.

sfc
01-25-2019, 02:30 PM
Yeah, that was my conclusion: If I'm not 100% controlling it, empty chamber.

M1A's r Best
01-25-2019, 02:58 PM
https://i.imgur.com/svAeNWbl.jpg?1

Little case from a company called Bull Dog. Two compartments created by a 1/2" padded divider. Pistol on one side, five magazines on the other side (bag comes with only two but I added 3 more pouches - 4" wide strap of nylon sewn to the back side of the padded divider and mole style single mag pouches.)

Easily fits behind the seat in my truck when we go on a winter road trip/visit to the mountains.

sfc
01-25-2019, 03:17 PM
I like that... and it looks like we've got similar setups... I'm waiting for the stamp... few months left.

LawDog
01-25-2019, 06:41 PM
My Lord, that Draco is ugly. But if it works, it works.

The bag seems appropriate. If it needs more structure, you can buy Kydex sheets and cut-and-mold them to fit. If you need to keep it quiet and prevent it from rattling around on the plastic, get some 1/4" closed-cell foam and glue it down to the Kydex with contact cement. You can also drill/cut through the Kydex to add webbing and paracord in such a way as to keep the gun positioned properly, but don't tie it down completely within the bag.

One of my discrete bags is a Blackhawk Diversion racquet bag. Unfortunately, you can't find them new anymore. Before I picked that up, I had a normal racquet bag, but I had to go through the rigmarole laid out above to make it a workable bag. Normal backpacks and such are just not designed to carry the weight of guns and ammo.

I recently got two SneakyBags Trick-or-Treat bags, but haven't run them enough to give more than initial impressions. The medium bag fits a CZ Scorpion pistol with a folded brace. The large bag fits a 10.5" AR with a side-folder, or the Scorpion with an Omega 9K attached. They are good solid bags, with an easily accessible weapon compartment. In black, it looks like a casual briefcase. I wouldn't leave it lying out on the seat, but if you can tuck it out of sight that would work.

I only bring these up because you are asking about options. I think the bag you've got can work. You may just need to make some modifications. While it isn't classy, duct tape and cardboard can accomplish a lot.

krav51
01-26-2019, 12:53 PM
If you can upgrade the mount for your red dot it will lower the profile a great deal. There are solutions that allow for cowitnessing the dot and BUIS, which is of course ideal. But the side benefit for carrying in your bag is that it's less likely to snag on the way out of a bag.

If a gun is not under my direct control, such as in my hands or in a holster, my default is empty chamber.

A gun in the bag - always, always always, empty chamber. Bedside SMG - empty chamber. Truck gun - empty chamber.

There are a few exceptions. I have a kydex holster mounted on the bed. No one is going to disturb it and the trigger is well protected. I keep that one chambered.
Brent, my bedside gun is my scorpion now, which has a very positive (read stiff) safety that is not coming off inadvertently. I certainly get not having a gun without a safety being in condition one without a holster covering the trigger.Could u elaborate on why you are opposed to a chambered round with a positive safety for home use. Thanks 9mm

Brent Yamamoto
01-26-2019, 01:14 PM
I can certainly see wanting the bedside gun chambered. After all the first sound the other guy hears should be the laughter of Satan after he’s dropped into Hell, rather than the sound of a racking bolt.

But my general practice is that if a gun isn’t under my immediate control, I leave it unchambered. That practice is consistent, so I KNOW if I pick up a long gun, or a gun that isn’t holstered, it must be chambered. As unlikely as it may be, I think some kind of accident is more likely than a home invasion. Kids, pets, visitors, vigorous activities in the bedroom...yeah unlikely that could cause it to fire but shit happens.

I can defintely see the argument for the bedside gun. But I address that with a holstered pistol and the long gun is a supplemental tool.

For me the empty chamber long gun is more about consistent practices. In many ways I am a “safety third” kind of person with violence stuff, but on this subject I compromise on the side of safety. I often don’t like the phrase “better safe than sorry” because it’s often an unthinking and counterproductive default. But in this case I think it fits.

LawDog
01-26-2019, 04:21 PM
my bedside gun is my scorpion now, which has a very positive (read stiff) safety that is not coming off inadvertently. I certainly get not having a gun without a safety being in condition one without a holster covering the trigger.Could u elaborate on why you are opposed to a chambered round with a positive safety for home use.There is room here for disagreement. Some things are absolutes; others are not. This one is not. Think it through, weigh the risks, and decide what works best for you.

Brent Yamamoto
01-26-2019, 04:38 PM
There is room here for disagreement. Some things are absolutes; others are not. This one is not. Think it through, weigh the risks, and decide what works best for you.

Agreed.

gatorgrizz27
05-19-2019, 04:59 PM
I can certainly see wanting the bedside gun chambered. After all the first sound the other guy hears should be the laughter of Satan after he’s dropped into Hell, rather than the sound of a racking bolt.

But my general practice is that if a gun isn’t under my immediate control, I leave it unchambered. That practice is consistent, so I KNOW if I pick up a long gun, or a gun that isn’t holstered, it must be chambered. As unlikely as it may be, I think some kind of accident is more likely than a home invasion. Kids, pets, visitors, vigorous activities in the bedroom...yeah unlikely that could cause it to fire but shit happens.

I can defintely see the argument for the bedside gun. But I address that with a holstered pistol and the long gun is a supplemental tool.

For me the empty chamber long gun is more about consistent practices. In many ways I am a “safety third” kind of person with violence stuff, but on this subject I compromise on the side of safety. I often don’t like the phrase “better safe than sorry” because it’s often an unthinking and counterproductive default. But in this case I think it fits.

I have a similar mindset, not to mention most long guns aren’t “drop safe.” If one is prepared, a rifle or shotgun in the bedroom will be there to respond to “bumps on the night.” However, it’s my belief that your carry pistol should also always be within easy reach.

Mine comes off my belt when I get home and goes on top of the mantel, out of reach of my son, still in the holster. When I go to bed it moves to my night stand. This allows a weapon that is immediately accessible if the first sound you here is your bedroom door opening when you’re wife is in bed, along with the safety of an unattended long gun having an empty chamber.

Greg Nichols
05-20-2019, 08:07 AM
Brent, my bedside gun is my scorpion now, which has a very positive (read stiff) safety that is not coming off inadvertently. I certainly get not having a gun without a safety being in condition one without a holster covering the trigger.Could u elaborate on why you are opposed to a chambered round with a positive safety for home use. Thanks 9mm

For me it's a case of muscle memory. If I take up a weapon that wasn't in my control I run the action and it's habitual, just like if someone hands me a weapon I check the chamber to validate the condition of the weapon before I begin doing anything with it. Worst case I kick a round out on the ground, best case I've chambered an empty weapon. Additionally, if it's a gun you're taking off of someone else, you've validated that it works and has ammo just by running the action.