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Brent Yamamoto
04-03-2018, 01:17 PM
I was asked for more detail on how to perform the takeoff from the Watch Your Back kata.

This footwork is straight out of a very old Okinawan Karate kata (Naihanchi for those interested). Thus we call it the Okinawa Takeoff.

It's not a replacement for the standard takeoff, it's just a different option. Honestly, I think of both takeoffs as the same thing...the Okinawa takeoff just incorporates some enhancements.

Pros & Cons:

The "Standard" Takeoff:
*Easy to do - it's very natural and anyone with even a sliver of athletic ability can do it
*It works standing still as well as walking
*On the negative side, it's more challenging on slick surfaces
*Some guys with knee problems have trouble because it creates a lot of impact

The Okinawa Takeoff:
*More difficult to learn, definitely takes more practice
*It harnesses gravity by falling into it, making it faster and less effort if performed correctly
*Slick surfaces aren't as much of a problem
*It's more gentle on the knees
*It can cover more ground from a single step

By the way, the standard takeoff can also harness gravity...just hinge the front foot as demonstrated in the video. I consider all these takeoffs just minor variations of the same thing.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFy9DxOPML0

Mark Hatfield
04-03-2018, 02:23 PM
Interesting. The Naihanchi I was taught contained nothing even remotely similar. Wansu and Chinto had a pivot resembling the static position but could not have been applied in this way. Interesting.

Brent Yamamoto
04-03-2018, 02:29 PM
Interesting. The Naihanchi I was taught contained nothing even remotely similar. Wansu and Chinto had a pivot resembling the static position but could not have been applied in this way. Interesting.

It's one of those things that is in there but not so explicit. There is what the kata explicitly shows...that is what everyone can see and you don't really need a teacher to know what it means. And then there is what is hidden...the only way to know this is to learn it from a teacher that knew.

The nami gaeshi kick - that is the isolated knee hinge movement. The crossing feet step - that is the switching feet movement.

There are certainly other applications for those movements, but the movement offline is primary. At least based on what I've been taught.

Gabriel Suarez
04-03-2018, 02:49 PM
Enpi has similar footwork. Its there in Tekki...if you look beyond the tournament application. Each footwork concept has best applications depending on where you start...where you are positioned in relation to the attack.

Brent Yamamoto
04-03-2018, 03:08 PM
Enpi has similar footwork. Its there in Tekki...if you look beyond the tournament application. Each footwork concept has best applications depending on where you start...where you are positioned in relation to the attack.

This.

The crossing foot action can be found in a few different kata. It's more obvious in some (the movement application from hinging the knee is much more obvious in Gekki Sai). I point to Naihanchi/Tekki because we know it's one of the oldest kata that exists. Also it's the one that I've studied most deeply.

Obviously it had a strong influence on Watch Your Back.

Mike OTDP
04-03-2018, 05:43 PM
Hmm....The Naihanchi katas I was taught all use a crossing step, but nothing like that. It's a pure lateral motion.

Having said that, this sort of discussion is a major reason why I come here. You treat shooting as a living art yet to be perfected.

Gabriel Suarez
04-03-2018, 05:54 PM
Ok...so use the crossing footwork fast and suddenly...with a balance leaning into the line of travel. Suddenly you will find the take off.

This stuff is not the bullshit karate you see at the strip mall or the local tournament...this is for killing...at least it was at one time...and it is for us as well...now...here.

Brent Yamamoto
04-03-2018, 08:46 PM
Gabe is exactly right.

Naihanchi is remarkably similar across different karate systems. Every version I have seen, although the hands move quickly the footwork is relatively slow. Slow movement almost always means that the technique is particularly significant.

The footwork is practiced slowly because it is emphasizing the development of solid posture and body structure. We test the structure using partners pushing against you. If you wilt like a flower from a gentle push, clearly your structure is not very strong. If your structure is solid, then you can deliver a much stronger strike, whether with the hands or feet. This slow practice also develops very strong balance.

Application is not always exactly the same as training exercises. However, the body structure is exactly the same. This footwork is meant not only to get you off the X quickly, but also to simultaneously block an incoming attack and deliver a powerful strike. You’ll have to take my word for it, it works very well.

Solid body structure is very important for hand to hand fighting. Not quite as important to reactive gunfighting, but it doesn’t hurt.

The footwork as I have demonstrated in the video is not taught everywhere because it is largely forgotten. But I know old men who were taught this as boys.

Knowledge is deeper than it appears on the surface. And remember that some things in karate were taught to deceive on purpose.

barnetmill
04-04-2018, 07:19 AM
I like the fact that last part is with long guns. I was wondering when we would get to them.

Dorkface
04-04-2018, 08:05 AM
I like the fact that last part is with long guns. I was wondering when we would get to them.

:dunno:
The foundational foot work is all the same. The difference is what you do with the upper body. Long guns are a little more complicated vs a handgun insofar as what you do to work the gun and get it where you need it.

Brent Yamamoto
04-04-2018, 08:07 AM
Fighting is fighting and bodies move the same way with every weapon.

Sometimes the characteristics of a given weapon require an adjustment with your technique. A take off to 7 o’clock is more complicated with a long gun and a pistol. But we have a workaround for that...and it’s hidden in “Watch Your Back“.

Imagine “Diagonal Lines” performed with a rifle. It works the same way. I don’t know if Gabe has designs on completely different long gun kata, but Diagonal Lines could easily translate as it is.

barnetmill
04-04-2018, 08:32 AM
Fighting is fighting and bodies move the same way with every weapon.

Sometimes the characteristics of a given weapon require an adjustment with your technique. A take off to 7 o’clock is more complicated with a long gun and a pistol. But we have a workaround for that...and it’s hidden in “Watch Your Back“.

Imagine “Diagonal Lines” performed with a rifle. It works the same way. I don’t know if Gabe has designs on completely different long gun kata, but Diagonal Lines could easily translate as it is.
Diagonal lines I am sure will be part of what ever rifle kata comes to be.

The assault rifle is not only a projectile weapon, but it can be used to strike people as in this photo from the AK DVD.
Below strike number one.
55390

Gabriel Suarez
04-04-2018, 09:39 AM
The other thing to consider guys is that the original Okinawan karateka (karate guys) trained outside in the open...in nature. When things were taken "inside" many of the original masters scoffed at "Parlor Karate". What problems does this bring? I will list them

1). The footing "outside" is different than the gym floor. There are no mats by the way for those who like to go to the ground. Training barefoot on a flat and clean floor is necessary in early development but as a fighter develops he must take his fighting system outside. The daily clothing, foot wear, weather, and surface will affect the expression of your skills in one way or another.

2). The environment may be constricted or it may be open. This forces the fighter to - wait for it - adapt to his environment. Some kata were designed for close fighting, others for open ground fighting...but the foot work of each can be adapted. The close quarters of a gym create an artificial limit to movement that may or may not be there in the real world.

3). Now for the one that will be unpopular. What you carry and HOW you carry will determine the effectiveness of this strategy. Carrying a weapon with a safety "on", in a thum-break holster, under a layer of concealment, behind your back will retard your ability to move dynamically and produce the weapon while doing so. I do not care how many SF-SEAL-SOCOM Ninjas carry in whatever way, we all have two arms and two legs and are limited by the container of the human body. Some things make this easier and others do not.

4). Another unpopular - the more athletic you are, the easier this is to do. If you can only manage to waddle to the firing line between doughnuts and cigs...sorry..you have much bigger issues. But this too can be remedied.

5). In original traditional kata, when you see something done slowly, it is because the original teacher wanted to emphasize its value and importance. Today slow segments are done that way at the McDojo for dramatic tension. That was never the original idea. Take the after-action process in Diagonal Lines. There is a definite change in tempo. or speed. There is a deliberateness that is shown in those movements. Why? Because one scans to see additional targets...not just to look like they are doing something cool.

Gabriel Suarez
04-04-2018, 09:40 AM
Well...keeping Felix secured in the bag - what we are working on is better.


Diagonal lines I am sure will be part of what ever rifle kata comes to be.

The assault rifle is not only a projectile weapon, but it can be used to strike people as in this photo from the AK DVD.
Below strike number one.
55390

Mike OTDP
04-04-2018, 12:07 PM
1). The footing "outside" is different than the gym floor. There are no mats by the way for those who like to go to the ground. Training barefoot on a flat and clean floor is necessary in early development but as a fighter develops he must take his fighting system outside. The daily clothing, foot wear, weather, and surface will affect the expression of your skills in one way or another.
This also shows strongly in fencing. Modern fencing is entirely indoors, often on a high-traction strip that allows a very aggressive footwork style. Old-school epee was fought out of doors on a grass strip. Much lower traction, and the old school epeeists favored a very subtle technique that was more based on bladework. When I was teaching fencing, I'd take the students outdoors on occasion just to get them used to it, because it made that much of a difference.

Gabriel Suarez
04-04-2018, 12:59 PM
Dont get me started on fencing. Fencing is exhibit A in the case of how sport totally eliminates any axtual combat value from a system and turns it into a game. Olymoic Tae Kwon Do is Exhibit B.

Brent Yamamoto
04-04-2018, 01:00 PM
Demonstrating the kata on a flat, clean surface is necessary so students know exactly what movement is intended.

Learning it on a flat, clean surface is helpful...eliminating variables when first learning it is important.

Once the pattern is learned, practice it in a variety of environments.

Very important to practice the takeoff on grass, sand, dry pavement, wet pavement, etc. You have to know how it works in different environments.

mattmann
04-04-2018, 06:35 PM
Brent, thanks for all your videos lately man. I’ve got my 2nd degree in Taekwondo and me and my family are starting Krav next week. Might not be the best, but hand to hand skills are the most important in my opinion. Plus great way to see how bad you need to work on your fitness [emoji23][emoji23]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

noonesshowmonkey
04-07-2018, 12:02 PM
One of the other massive advantages of this kind of movement--where one 'falls' into motion rather than 'stepping'--is that it subverts the natural movement pattern that humans expect to see. When people do not have the visual cues of normal movement, they do not 'see' it. If you do not step forward, your head does not bob up or down. If you do not step forward, your feet don't lead a movement finished with your hips. Etc.

These kinds of 'takeoff' movements use a different system of generating forward motion than is typical to the human animal. As a result, if you're clever about it, you can move quite a distance before your opponent sees you. Speed in fighting comes from two places: actual velocity, and the suddenness of movement. Moving without telegraph is 'fast'.

This kind of footwork is fundamental to accelerating without telegraphing your motion.

If it takes your opponent longer to realize what you've done, you can 'teleport' towards them. The result is mentally unbalancing. It can legitimately cause a kind of vertigo. Koryu jujutsu teaches this kind of movement, too. I've had a man execute this kind of movement so quickly and suddenly and without warning, and move into a dominant position, that by the time my mind caught up with things, I literally recoiled like a cat, jumping back. It was too late, and he had already struck me.