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Brent Yamamoto
03-25-2018, 07:10 PM
An Aikido sword kata. This is usually performed with the bokken (wooden practice sword). Compare with Gabe’s first pistol kata for differences and similarities.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLJhFn8QIkQkem1hvNbRtQyxxJTPsOmAHj&v=cR INQ5spN-8

55303
Stay tuned for more.

Gabriel Suarez
03-25-2018, 07:33 PM
Craig - OSU! Nice job.

Interesting that we are looking at a sword form. Some of my ...associates from the old days...guys with body counts that were respectable by any measure...looked at sword training to enhance their gun skills. In truth the two disciplines are parallel.

"The sword is not mightier than the gun, nor the reverse. Rather...sword and gun are equal...in accord...just like the sword and the pen in accord."

Brent Yamamoto
03-25-2018, 08:44 PM
I agree. The sword and the gun are in parallel.

What I find most useful with the sword is that it acts as a magnifying glass for your body movement. Mistakes that you can hide with empty hands, or perhaps even a pistol, are very obvious when using the sword. I don’t practice sword so much for fighting (though it can certainly be used that way); I use it more for body-mechanics training.

Pistol kata video coming up in another thread...

Brent Yamamoto
03-25-2018, 09:35 PM
This one is a Karate kata from the Naha lineage. Short stances, emphasis on solid structure and power, short/fast movement, power generation from dropping/rising. This is an in-fighting kata.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=uyMp5lCeC4c

Brent Yamamoto
03-25-2018, 10:47 PM
And one from the Shuri lineage. This is also an in-fighting kata. One of the themes of this one is fast movement off-line from the attacker. There are a ton of applications for the hand movements, but primary importance is the footwork and body structure. It may not be obvious but the patterns of this kata are found in the pistol kata “Watch Your Back”.

Also included is a comparison of Japanese and Okinawan versions. This may not be the best kata to illustrate the difference because the two versions are quite similar (other kata have more obvious differences even to those unfamiliar with karate), but it is a good demonstration of how the “telephone game“ plays out with kata. Overtime, small changes result in something completely different.

One obvious difference is the crescent kick found in the Japanese version. This was not present in the original, and though it may seem like a small change, it completely destroys the footwork lesson the kata was trying to impart. The “new” version still has value (Pistol Ground Fighting students may recognize that crescent kick...imagine performing it from your back with the enemy in your guard), but the original point was lost.

There are a few other outward differences, each of which has an impact on how the techniques are applied. The major difference is internal structure. There is much more emphasis on structure in the original Okinawan practice. This made the kata useful and effective in combat, and not just a physical display of “art”.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kcPW_yrtv9U

Sgt. Psycho
03-26-2018, 01:41 PM
This one is a Karate kata from the Naha lineage. Short stances, emphasis on solid structure and power, short/fast movement, power generation from dropping/rising. This is an in-fighting kata.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=uyMp5lCeC4c

Definitely a Kata vs the drill that I learned. Yours has more foot movement and body turning than ours. Our foot movement consists of just 2 steps forward and 2 steps back, all in Sanchin-dachi. The elbow strikes are performed 2 times each side, with the strikes to the rear done with both elbows simultaneously each time.

Brent Yamamoto
03-26-2018, 02:50 PM
Definitely a Kata vs the drill that I learned. Yours has more foot movement and body turning than ours. Our foot movement consists of just 2 steps forward and 2 steps back, all in Sanchin-dachi. The elbow strikes are performed 2 times each side, with the strikes to the rear done with both elbows simultaneously each time.

I had forgotten that Goju has a few different two person sets. I've seen a few but can't say I'm that familiar with them. I do know that some are modeled after kata and are practiced to gain proficiency at kata application. I wonder if the drill you're referring to was designed from this kata.

I tend to look at two person sets a little more loosely than kata. There's some value in having "set" routines but I think it's good when they are not necessarily so strict. But I know that some look at those routines so strictly that they might as well be kata.

Nothing wrong with two person kata. Judo/Jujutsu and Aikido have them (throwing/joint lock systems mostly have no choice), as do some sword systems.

One thing I appreciate about Goju-Ryu is that it has done a pretty good job of keeping the kata the same. They have also done a much better job of keeping the kata application as part of the curriculum and have not been completely overtaken by competition emphasis. All the Goju-ryu people I know (and I know a lot) know how to fight.

Ted Demosthenes
03-26-2018, 04:09 PM
Recommendation:

Many may know this, BJIC, when watching the YT video, you may want to slow it down for clearer understanding of the footwork in particular. Use the "Settings" wheel/button in the lower right corner and set .5 or .25 to really see what Yama-San's legs and feet are doing. He DO dance well. ;-}

Benjamin Liu
03-26-2018, 05:59 PM
I learned the Okinawan version of Naihanchi when I studied Shorin Ryu. Well, just at a 9th Kyu level, not the deeper lessons. It wasn't aware there was another version of it, or that the system was different in Japan.

Sgt. Psycho
03-26-2018, 08:16 PM
I did a little googling - looks like Sensei Braddock (my Okinawan Goju Sensei) and Sensei Buffington (Bando) are still teaching. Think I will stop in next time I am up that way.

http://www.angelfire.com/wv2/bando/goju-ryu.html

Sgt. Psycho
03-26-2018, 08:19 PM
Brent - thank you for posting the videos.