PDA

View Full Version : Gabe's knife?



sanchezero
10-03-2003, 11:36 AM
Gabe, in your 'transition - knife to gun' piece, what is the knife you're using?

Is the handle as long as it looks (ie:significantly longer than the blade)?

If so, what advantages/disadvantages do you feel are there?

Thanks.

:)

Paul Gomez
10-03-2003, 01:40 PM
Looks like one of the new X2 Voyagers. Basicly, a Vaquero Grande handle with a more conventional blade profile. According to Cold Steel literature, it's got a 6-inch blade & a 7.25-inch handle.

http://www.coldsteel.com/folding-knives-voyager-series.html

Gabriel Suarez
10-03-2003, 03:09 PM
Cold Steel 5" Voyager Bowie. It has a great balance of nandle and blade, the cutting power of a fixed blade. I got it when I was living in Kalifrnia because the silly laws over there allow for any length of blade as long as its a folder and as long as its closed. I have one of the 6" long blades also, and while its in essence a folding sword, its a bit too large for day to day carry.

I also carry a Spyderco Chinook for the times when the Cold Steel is a bit much.

sanchezero
10-03-2003, 04:37 PM
Thanks.

:)

Ragin Cajun
10-06-2003, 12:22 PM
A FOLDER?? Didn't I see you with a fixed blade in front of your gun at the Simpsonville, SC classes??

Gabriel Suarez
10-06-2003, 01:31 PM
A FOLDER?? Didn't I see you with a fixed blade in front of your gun at the Simpsonville, SC classes??

Nope, that was a Spyderco Chinook if I recall correctly. I don't generally carried fixed knives because since I travel so much, and since fixed blades are a no-go in certain areas, I want to have a set of skills I can use anywhere I go. Folding knives can go just about everywhere....even California.

Ragin Cajun
10-07-2003, 05:23 AM
A folder! How do you get it out and open quickly - off hand?

Where one doesn't have to travel like you do and needs quick access while "on duty" to a knife, what's the best type/location/etc?

Thanks

Bill Lance
10-07-2003, 06:24 AM
I suspect the answer is much like "How do I get to Carnegie Hall?" question. Answer---> "Practice my son, practice!". :D

sween1911
10-07-2003, 07:24 AM
Occasionally, I carry a Cold Steel Voyager Xtra Large Tanto 50/50 serrated. Easy to slip in the waistband, big and sharp. The only problem that I have with them is that the lock seems to be easily disengaged with a tight grip on the large plastic handle.

Gabe, how do you work with those big lockbacks without inadvertantly closing them? Any modifications or do you consciously develop techniques which avoid the lock area? I have ground the lever down a little bit so it's a little harder to disengage accidentally, but I'd like to hear your experience with them.

Gabriel Suarez
10-07-2003, 09:26 PM
Gabe, how do you work with those big lockbacks without inadvertantly closing them? Any modifications or do you consciously develop techniques which avoid the lock area? I have ground the lever down a little bit so it's a little harder to disengage accidentally, but I'd like to hear your experience with them.

I've never had that problem. I will say that I use the grip called a sabre grip, that is with the thumb along the back of the blade. This helps me index the knife better (if you can put a thumb on it, you can cut it) than the convulsive grip, aka "icepick grip".

Perhaps the dynamics of this prevent the disengagement of the locks?

I don't always carry the big blades, but I wish I could. The size of cut you can do with a 5" blade is spectacular. I usually carry it either in back pocket (continuos movement if pistol is not there when you reach for it), or in the front waits abnd along what some call the groin line. There it is almost invisible.

I also like the tip-up carry mode as it takes less manuevering to get the blade staged for opening, and is a natural for inertia opening.

bill clancy
10-13-2003, 10:12 AM
Gabe,
What are your thoughts on serrated, vs plain, vs combo edges?

Gabriel Suarez
10-13-2003, 12:40 PM
Gabe,
What are your thoughts on serrated, vs plain, vs combo edges?
Personally, I like and use plain edges.

michael
10-13-2003, 05:21 PM
I have a friend who is CIA, ex-DIA, ex-marine and is a high ranking instructor in the Bujinkan, which is the orgainzation that governs the martial art of Budo Taijutsu (ninjutsu). He is one of the most skilled martial artists I have ever seen and has been in many hand to hand fights in combat. They did extensive testing of serrated vs. plain edge and different blade lengths. They did cutting tests on beef roasts wrapped in a couple of layers of denim and other clothing. Their conclusions were that serrated edges cause a very minute "bouncing" of the blade as it cuts through meat, which decreases the effectiveness of the cut. They are better for cutting rope and things like that, but not for cutting humans. I carry a plain edge for this reason. They also came to the conclusion that you get a deeper cut with a blade of 2.5-3 inches than a blade of 4-5 inches. This is due to the amount of cutting force that you can apply to a shorter blade vs. a long blade. He says that a smaller, quality blade will cut all the way to the bone and a longer blade will only cause more superficial cuts. I carry a Spyderco Native with a 3" blade which is made of CPMS30V steel as my main knife, but sometimes I also carry my Benchmade AFCK with 3.9" blade. There is some advantage of reach with a longer blade, but it is probably negated by the cutting power of the shorter, plain blade. I also have a Cold Steel Voyager with 4" blade that I like, but it has a broken clip and is being repaired (this is the second one that's broken). What do you guys think?

John Silver
10-13-2003, 05:57 PM
I trained in a Bujinkan dojo for 2 1/2 years and was beyond impressed by the techniques.

So, that's probably where I picked up my preference for short, plain edged knives. We were taught that all of the main targets - nerve bundles and arteries were all close to the surface of the skin, no more than an inch or two at the most. The techniques were a bit unconventional in that there was a lot of reverse grip work, but that simply tied into using the same movements as you would for their hand strikes as well.

A small blade takes up less room, is easier to hide open or shut, looks friendlier in court, and can do devestating damage. A few years later, I sat through parts of a Greg Hamilton knife course, and he said pretty much the same thing - long, hard cuts with a shorter, plain edged knife would get the job done. Long or short blade, it seems the more people use knives, the more they like the plain edge.

None of this is to say that large, long blades are bad - far from it. Life isn't perfect, and there is no way to be sure of a strong, bearing cut. The larger blade can give you a bit more margin for error in a slashing move. Also, a longer blad will do more damage in a full stab. That's the other side of the coin.

My real life experience has been limited to the knife as a tool, but I prefer the plain edge for that as well.