PDA

View Full Version : Your Favorite Cut: Beef



Pokeguyjai
03-22-2013, 06:27 AM
Hey guys,

Just a little spin on the bon vivant topics since I think we are on our third beer thread. :grin:

What is your favorite cut of beef and why? How do you personally like it cooked. I'll do pork next... beef is an easier topic.

gps man
03-22-2013, 06:38 AM
I like a good rib eye, preferably from Blue Dog Ranch beef...
Grilled over oak or hickory, or in a hot cast iron skillet.

50BMG
03-22-2013, 06:38 AM
Ribeye.

--I let it sit for 30 mins outside the fridge to let the beef rest prior to grilling.
--lightly brush both sides with olive oil
--season both sides with flake sea salt and freshly ground peppercorn.

--preheat the grill to med-high
--cook 5-7 mins on each side till done.

I cook med to med rare and this method always delivers an extraordinarily juicy and tender steak.

Gabriel Suarez
03-22-2013, 06:44 AM
Best I have had was Wagyu Filet at Cut at the Venetian. It was indescribable and so good we had food hangovers the next day.

Ragsbo
03-22-2013, 07:02 AM
Rib-eye steak; medium rare to rare (I want it warm all the way through but where a decent vet can have it back on it's feet in a hour or so!)

Hamburger (well done)! With cheese, lettuce, tomato, peanut butter

Vigilant
03-22-2013, 07:06 AM
Bone-in/Cowboy cut ribeye mid-rare! I had a Wagyu Bone-in at Jeff Ruby's on the Waterfront before it floated away, and it was AMAZING!

Jack Rumbaugh
03-22-2013, 07:07 AM
Filet, rib eye, and prime rib. Really, most any heated cow parts will do. Love Kobe beef. Haven't had Wagyu... Yet.

Med Rare.

Lucky Jackson
03-22-2013, 07:11 AM
The Rib-eye is a great steak, although my favorite cut is the Filet Mignon.

A Filet grilled to a bright medium rare served with grilled asparagus is my way to eat Warrior Bon Vivant.

L J

bdcbbq
03-22-2013, 07:26 AM
My favorite cut is beef brisket. Brisket can be used in so many ways and has great flavor. It is also relatively inexpensive too. I buy and use brisket quite often to make BBQ beef, corned beef, pastrami, hamburger, pot roast, chili, beef stew/soup, and sausage. Brisket does not get the respect it deserves. The key is to cook it low and slow with a moist heat, choose well marbled choice full briskets to trim, cut, and grind yourself. I really splurged once and bought a Wagyu brisket and BBQ'd it direct over wood coals with just salt and pepper. That was an excellent meal.

But, without a doubt the ribeye is my favorite steak.

I also know the finest pork cut, but since that will be another thread I'll wait to post it.

bae
03-22-2013, 07:48 AM
Though I am fond of ribeye done in an iron skillet, hanger steak, marinated and grilled rare is not to be overlooked. It is well worth your time to make an arrangement with a local rancher or butcher to secure a supply.

Housertl
03-22-2013, 07:50 AM
Filet, rib eye, and prime rib. Really, most any heated cow parts will do. Love Kobe beef. Haven't had Wagyu... Yet.

Med Rare.

Jack, I understand the diff between Kobe and Wagyu to be something like the diff betweeen champagne and sparkling white wine. Kobe is wagyu, but only wagyu from the Kobe prefecture can be called kobe. Wagyu is just the breed of cattle, like angus. So, you HAVE had wagyu. And damn is it tasty.

Heywood
03-22-2013, 07:50 AM
Dry aged Rib eye (14 days) Or filet mignon, from my own grass fed cow. (100%PRIME) Only charcoal grilled or cast iron seared. Though fresh elk backstraps over a campfire can give them a run for their money sometimes, but I think that is more ambiance than anything.
In fact my wife and kids are leaving town today so as usual I will be doing up a nice filet tonight.

Pokeguyjai
03-22-2013, 07:53 AM
Beef ribs: Cut korean style. Marinated (soy sauce based, brown sugar, sesame oil, onions, and garlic) over night and grilled make it awesome.

Brisket: Can't beat a well smoked brisket!!

Ox tail: great marinated and slow cooked. Crock pot, in a soup, etc. Think of it as super beef ribs since it wraps around bone and is extremely close to joints. Joint meat = maintains moisture for longer periods of time... aka harder to overcook

Cow tongue: Thin sliced is the best way to cook it from my experience. Marinated and slow cooked or if extremely fresh you can grill it. Had it like that at a Japanese BBQ in LA and man it was good.

Jamaican Curry Cowfoot (hoof): Hell YEHH!

Tripe: Dim sum style, sadly it's not very popular anymore with Americans. But Asians love it... it's almost as expensive as a regular beef.

Pokeguyjai
03-22-2013, 07:58 AM
Jack, I understand the diff between Kobe and Wagyu to be something like the diff betweeen champagne and sparkling white wine. Kobe is wagyu, but only wagyu from the Kobe prefecture can be called kobe. Wagyu is just the breed of cattle, like angus. So, you HAVE had wagyu. And damn is it tasty.

Wagyu just means Japanese cow. I could elaborate but I'll let Wikipedia do it for me. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagyu

Wagyu is great raw too... fyi. The marbling has more pronunciation but the fat doesn't get seared. Think of it as meat sushi!

John Chambers
03-22-2013, 08:11 AM
Prime rib, medium rare! Also like a pan seared top sirloin, 1.5 inch thick minimum, served rare.

Jack Rumbaugh
03-22-2013, 08:15 AM
Wagyu just means Japanese cow. I could elaborate but I'll let Wikipedia do it for me. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagyu

Wagyu is great raw too... fyi. The marbling has more pronunciation but the fat doesn't get seared. Think of it as meat sushi!

Carpaccio is most yummo.

CaptBeach
03-22-2013, 08:19 AM
+1 for Hanger or Flat Iron steak...you gotta try it...grab a whole one, a pound or so or two if your going to split it...let it sit out on the counter to room temp...pat dry...liberally oil it with EVOO, sea or kosher salt and grind some fresh black pepper...2 minutes on a hot grill at a 45 degree, rotate 90 degrees for 2 minutes to get good grill marks on one side, flip it at a 45 degree bias for 2 minutes, rotate 90 degrees for another 2 minutes...you'll get a perfectly medium rare steak that rivals a good filet at 1/4 the price...friggin awesome cut...I likem better than a ribeye now...not as good as prime rib but damn near...

Vigilant
03-22-2013, 08:23 AM
For murky clarity, Prime rib and ribeye are essentially the same thing. Ribeye is cut into steaks from the rib section, and then cooked. Prime rib is generally the center of the whole rib section that is cooked and then cut. Oh, and just because it says "Prime" Rib, doesn't necessarily mean it is prime beef.

Jack Rumbaugh
03-22-2013, 08:27 AM
For murky clarity, Prime rib and ribeye are essentially the same thing. Ribeye is cut into steaks from the rib section, and then cooked. Prime rib is generally the center of the whole rib section that is cooked and then cut.

True, but the difference in the preparation methods gives each a distinct flavor.

bc45
03-22-2013, 08:34 AM
give me a 2lb porterhouse cooked slow over mesquite after a hard day clearing brush

Vigilant
03-22-2013, 08:35 AM
True, but the difference in the preparation methods gives each a distinct flavor.That's where the murky clarity comes in, as "Prime Rib" is essentially a preparation method as opposed to a cut of beef, and I do loves me some Prime Rib too! The cut for PR would be either a bonelss ribeye roast or a standing rib roast if left bone-in.

daniel87
03-22-2013, 09:01 AM
Rib eye. Salt pepper medium

Sent from my LGL35G using Tapatalk 2

Goodspeed(TPF)
03-22-2013, 10:07 AM
Filet. Warm off the cow or passed quickly through a room with a flame in it.

New Generation
03-22-2013, 10:08 AM
Ribeye or Tri-Tip thawed out all the way and seasoned at least and hour before the grill. 3min each side at 600 or 4.5 to 5min each side at 500, all depends on the thickness. After taking off the grill put them in an airtight container and let them rest for 10 min. Served with baked potatoe with all the fixings, baked beans and steam kale mixed with olive oil S&P and minced garlic. Add your favorite Brew and you have a hearty meal.

Heywood
03-22-2013, 11:02 AM
Beef ribs: Cut korean style. Marinated (soy sauce based, brown sugar, sesame oil, onions, and garlic) over night and grilled make it awesome.

Ox tail: great marinated and slow cooked. Crock pot, in a soup, etc. Think of it as super beef ribs since it wraps around bone and is extremely close to joints. Joint meat = maintains moisture for longer periods of time... aka harder to overcook.
My best friend is Hawaiian and his family always makes their version of kalbi. It never lasts long when I am around.

Oxtail is by far the best soup meat there is in my opinion. I make it at least two or three times a year.

michael
03-22-2013, 03:26 PM
Cowboy bone-in grass fed ribeye is my favorite, followed by filet and flank steak.

Goodspeed(TPF)
03-22-2013, 03:39 PM
Cowboy bone-in grass fed ribeye is my favorite, followed by filet and flank steak.Brings up a question I have for WT participants. We raise free range, grass fed Angus here in WI. How many of you have had it and compared it to corn/silage/meal/grain/soy fed cattle? Which do you prefer, if either, and why?

Tanampo
03-22-2013, 03:44 PM
Bone-in bison ribeye, all hippy-fied grass-fed, hormone-free, and quickly killed.

Heywood
03-22-2013, 04:58 PM
Brings up a question I have for WT participants. We raise free range, grass fed Angus here in WI. How many of you have had it and compared it to corn/silage/meal/grain/soy fed cattle? Which do you prefer, if either, and why?
I raise my own and grass fed is by far the way to go. Though I do finish with oats to soften them up before slaughter. Have tried others, no comparison.

TrojanSkyCop1
03-22-2013, 05:27 PM
Bone-in Ribeye
Porterhouse

baker
03-22-2013, 05:34 PM
Slow roasted, or even smoked prime rib, but with a few caveats.


Bone in, fat cap on. Most restaurants these days serve a roasted ribeye. The bones aren't present, and the 1" fat cap is missing also. These are called "109" Ribs in the industry, and almost nobody does them anymore. Special-order time.
These are usually netted, after removing the blade-bone and separating the fat cap for easy removal. Cut the netting.
Remove the fat cap. Season underneath it. If all you use is Kosher salt and black pepper, fine, just use plenty. Season the sides and bottom. Replace Fat cap. Season on top of it heavily. The fat will melt and run into the meat, carrying the seasoning with it.
Brown at high heat, 425 deg. or so, then reduce to 275-300 and continue until 115 deg. in the center of the meat.
Allow to rest 30 minutes or more at kitchen temperature before removing fat cap and serving. I like Gorgonzola butter and jus.
Making "au jus." I use beef or veal stock, plus the pan drippings, red wine and seasonings, but describing the process is too tedious for me at the moment.
The meat will be entirely medium rare, end to end, and bone to top, save a little bit on the edge of the end cuts, and not just in the middle, like it is when roasting a ribeye. Richer, better seasoned, and more flavorful in general, just because of the presence of bones and fat cap

NateR
03-22-2013, 05:38 PM
Filet, or occasionally NY Strip. Medium rare, rubbed with black pepper or other simple seasonings.

A-1 is for French fries. If a steak needs "steak sauce" to be edible, send it back.

N

AlexSpartan
03-22-2013, 07:52 PM
Tripe and tendon. In Pho.

Mike Heckathorn
03-22-2013, 08:03 PM
I like taking a thick cut TBone (20oz or better), and cutting it off the bone (as tight to the bone as possible). I cook the fillet side for 60-90sec on each side (with a medium temperature grill/pan) I cook the strip side for 2-3mins each side with a high temperature grill/pan.

Maddog6
03-22-2013, 09:15 PM
Rib Eye (medium) from Ruth's Chris. I have tried all of the independent steak houses in Scottsdale, Las Vegas, LA, Chicago, Seattle, Portland and they all had too much fat. One time so much so I couldn't take it. It may be a chain but it has my favorite cut down!

michael
03-23-2013, 08:37 AM
Brings up a question I have for WT participants. We raise free range, grass fed Angus here in WI. How many of you have had it and compared it to corn/silage/meal/grain/soy fed cattle? Which do you prefer, if either, and why?

The absolute best beef I have ever had came from a friend who raised his cattle on grass, they free roamed and grazed daily, and used no supplements or hormones at all. It tasted unlike any I have ever had, including the best cuts at places like Ruth's Chris and other high-end steak places. There is no comparison.

Mr. Anthony
03-23-2013, 08:44 AM
The absolute best beef I have ever had came from a friend who raised his cattle on grass, they free roamed and grazed daily, and used no supplements or hormones at all. It tasted unlike any I have ever had, including the best cuts at places like Ruth's Chris and other high-end steak places. There is no comparison.

Grass-fed and grain-fed cows might as well be two separate species, taste-wise.

Sent via A-10 Warthog

michael
03-23-2013, 11:53 AM
Grass-fed and grain-fed cows might as well be two separate species, taste-wise.

Sent via A-10 Warthog

Yes indeed, they are worlds apart.

ss58
03-25-2013, 07:35 AM
Last night...tough to beat a bone in spice rubbed ribeye. Local place dry ages beef in house...it was good. Some lump crabmeat, Sam Seasonal and a Woodford to finish. Good night...

29798

Silat Student
03-25-2013, 05:42 PM
Been on a Beef Rib kick of late. I gave jdsumner a few chuck short ribs the other day and he seems to like 'em well enough. Think I got my spice rub for that almost dialed in.

But for me, one of my all time favorite "beef experiences" is breaking down a full ribeye roast and rubbing the trimmings on a spice plate (usually just a little chili powder, cracked black pepper, and coarse kosher salt) and then throwing them into a waiting rocket hot cast iron skillet, only to be fished out a few moments later to pop into my mouth. Although putting a proper steak down on the plate in front of friends and family is cool, it's the "scoobie snacks" in the kitchen while I'm cooking that I enjoy the most.

bae
05-08-2013, 08:45 PM
Tonight I had perhaps the best beef ever.

I had some lovely thick filet migons a freind gave me from his farm (not my favorite cut, but heck, why not?). Wrapped them in bacon, simple salt, pepper, did them nicely uber-rare on the grill.

They were just out resting on the plate when my pager went off. Search & Rescue call in the park 2 mins from my house. Lost camper. I grabbed my S&R bag, looking longingly at the steak. Laced on my boots, and was heading out the door, when my wife handed me my filet, wrapped in a couple of tortillas.

So I dragged that off on the search, and ate it as we were looking for the fellow. We found him, relatively healthy, in about an hour.

Best. Steak. Ever. I think it was because of the situation/mood :-)

fidalgoman
05-08-2013, 09:05 PM
Itís hard to pick just one. Iíve had so many good steaks and itís so dependent on how they are fixed I couldnít pick just one kind. The best ďoneĒ steak I ever tasted was a thirteen oz. tenderloin in Butte Montana many years ago. My Mother made a living was as a gourmet cook most of her life so I could say we became quite spoiled through mid-adulthood. Each quality cut has its own nuances, as does its preparation.

P.D.
05-08-2013, 11:48 PM
I'll go with a prime rib roast. Even the leftover are great.

BeardedPelican
05-09-2013, 04:26 AM
I prefer a medium rare new york strip.

FinnMac
05-09-2013, 08:15 AM
Best steak I have ever had was in Buenos Aires Argentina. It was one their unique cuts called "baby beef" Grande.:drooling:

red-it
05-09-2013, 08:57 AM
Grass fed Texas, Bone in Ribeye, medium rare peppercorn rub, hot flat grill with butter :drooling:

RJW
05-09-2013, 10:45 AM
All beef grass fed from my farms. Center cut tenderloin for steak tartare or carpaccio. Cowboy bone in ribeye cooked rare over a hot grill with hawaian salt put on two hours before cooking and fresh ground pepper at the table. Also the ribeye with a coffee and alepo powder rub, cook one minute on each side in an oiled cast iron skillet and finished rare in a 550 degree oven.

DavidC
05-09-2013, 10:58 AM
Grass-fed filet mignon, medium-rare, or medium (for my wife). a little olive oil, salt, and pepper. Here in Northern Virginia, they're available year-round at Wegman's. We've also had good results at local farmers markets.

Mr. Anthony
05-09-2013, 01:24 PM
I forgot about this one! A buddy of mine bought a New York loin and a Ribeye loin, vacuum sealed them in a one-way barrier bag, and dry aged them in his fridge. The one in the pictures here was pulled out after 35 days; we later had one that aged 52.

We took the loin out, shaved off the thin layer of "bark" that had developed on the outside, sliced it into 2-inch-thick steaks, and hit it on each side with a really hot charcoal grill. Salt and pepper finish. I don't know if it was the best steak I've ever had, but if it wasn't I can't readily think of one that was better. Absolutely fantastic; the fat was melt-in-your-your mouth and caramelized, like meat candy. Holy crap it was good.

Here's the loin as we cut it up. That single steak on the left is 2 inches thick and huge, for reference.
http://i747.photobucket.com/albums/xx114/antman451/Food/IMAG0431_zpsbdf8e0bf.jpg (http://s747.photobucket.com/user/antman451/media/Food/IMAG0431_zpsbdf8e0bf.jpg.html)

http://i747.photobucket.com/albums/xx114/antman451/Food/IMAG0432-1_zpsbf1c440d.jpg (http://s747.photobucket.com/user/antman451/media/Food/IMAG0432-1_zpsbf1c440d.jpg.html)