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eight_88888888
12-07-2005, 10:00 PM
I've heard various rumors from unqualified sources that exercising 4 hours before bedtime is detrimental to one's health. Does anyone know if this is true? If so, how and why?

I remember times when being tired after a workout helped me fall asleep.

Skpotamus
12-07-2005, 10:23 PM
My typical nights end up with me coming home, working out pretty hard, getting a shower and then going straight to bed. I've been doing this kinda routine since I was 16 years old (now 24) and I've never had any problems with my health that could be workout related.

Back when I still had time to compete, I would have a hard workout during the day, a technical workout in the evening, and at night would do calisthenics until I was too tired to do anymore. Follow that up with some flexibility work and stretching, a shower and then sleep like a baby... seemed to do pretty well for me in my fights. I had very good cardio and muscular endurance.

ttt

Steve Camp
12-07-2005, 10:34 PM
According to a friend, a former bodybuilder, and a highly regarded personal fitness trainer:



It's "BS"

seth bailey
12-08-2005, 12:30 AM
I remember my folks telling me that if I exercised before bed I wouldn't be able to go to sleep. I think it's b.s. , but like with everything it's probably somewhere in the middle. Know you're body, and trust what it tells you. But then I'm probably an idiot....;)

Wylycoyte
12-08-2005, 12:51 AM
I remember my folks telling me that if I exercised before bed I wouldn't be able to go to sleep. I think it's b.s. , but like with everything it's probably somewhere in the middle. Know you're body, and trust what it tells you. But then I'm probably an idiot....;)

If I work out, Im generally wide awake for at least 3 hours after a workout. Perhaps that just means I haven't worked out hard enough. :D

michael
12-08-2005, 01:03 AM
Won't hurt you a bit, but it does make it hard to sleep, at least for me. My wife can work out and drop right off to sleep, but most can't do that.

seth bailey
12-08-2005, 01:06 AM
Just saying we're all different. Everyone works best when they can listen to their body. It's something I learned playing hurt and living hard for my scant 26 years on the planet. Maybe someone with more experience thinks I'm an idiot. I always thought the working out before bed time was an old wives tale. But if the adrenaline, or the if endorphens are pumping, I can see where it would be hard to go to asleep. Everbody's different. That's all.

Cold War Scout
12-08-2005, 02:40 AM
I would work out right before bed rather than not work out at all. I think it's mainly a loss of sleep thing, although I don't think it's a good idea to jump into bed while huffing and puffing. Walk it off first. Never come to a complete stop while huffing and puffing. Just my philosophy.

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
12-08-2005, 04:12 AM
Not directly on point (how rare:rolleyes: ) I would offer the idea of taking one's pulse upon awakening before getting out of bed. After doing this for a while and getting a sense of what it averages, one has a reference point. If, on a given morning your pulse is outside its usual range, that is a sign that it may be a good day for a rest day or that one's mineral/trace mineral balances may be a bit depleted.

As I type this I must admit that it has been a few years since I have done this-- hmmm need to get back to this. Back when I was still actively stickfighting, my wake-up pulse was 48 (resting pulse during the day was 52) and if my wake up pulse was 54 or above I would call a rest day. These numbers may sound very good, but I think there may be a genetic element here-- and I have noticed that I also seem to not want for my heart rate to get as high as some people do. Point being, don't compete with the numbers of others, just do what is best for you.

Lou Costello
12-08-2005, 06:48 AM
For us more 'seasoned' types collecting retirement, the aches and pains associated with working out seem to contribute to a restless sleep. Then again, maybe we need to drink a few glasses of water and then allow a few hours for the waste products to flush out of our bloodstream.

Hopefully, somebody with a better knowledge of human physiology could chime in.

MDTS
12-08-2005, 09:06 AM
I was doing a Combatives workout on my SparPro before bed every night for like a week and would work up a good sweat. Slept terrible every night I did that. Once I stopped I slept fine. Now I tack that workout onto the end of my PT in the late aftrernoon, early evening.

eight_88888888
12-08-2005, 10:55 PM
another question: on a contrapositive note, i've heard out that morning is a good time to work out. Is it just because it's cooler in the morning, or what? (i've personally noticed a morning workout gets the digestive system moving). Try following it with a cold shower and hearty breakfast?

Ian Wendt
12-09-2005, 03:51 AM
If you work out in the morning, before breakfast, you'll be hitting your fat stores harder than if you work out after you've had a chance to load up again with carbs. Most of your carb storage will be used up during the night. Bodybuilders often use this to drop their bodyfat even further down for competitions.

Lou Costello
12-09-2005, 06:35 AM
I'll let you know about the morning exercise. We have over a foot of snow and I want to go outside to perform my award winning 'snow shovel kata.'

remi95
12-09-2005, 08:11 AM
This article on MSN recently addressed some things about sleep. Here is the link http://articles.health.msn.com/id/100111281?GT1=7508
If it doesn't work you may cut and paste into your URL, or go to MSN's website it's on their main page today.

Thanks,
Rex

alabaster
12-09-2005, 04:14 PM
I agree with Ian on his point. When I'm trying to cut weight I get on the treadmill after I get up and before I eat anything. On working out before bed I can't be of much help there. I usually workout between the hours of 3pm and 5 pm (except for the early morning treadmill). I just know I sleep like a rock on days that I work out on and am a little restless on days that I don't work out on.

michael
12-09-2005, 06:57 PM
If you work out in the morning, before breakfast, you'll be hitting your fat stores harder than if you work out after you've had a chance to load up again with carbs. Most of your carb storage will be used up during the night. Bodybuilders often use this to drop their bodyfat even further down for competitions.

Excellent point. This is also one of the "Body for Life" principles from Bill Phillip's book.

eight_88888888
12-09-2005, 09:50 PM
This article on MSN recently addressed some things about sleep. Here is the link http://articles.health.msn.com/id/100111281?GT1=7508
If it doesn't work you may cut and paste into your URL, or go to MSN's website it's on their main page today.

Thanks,
Rex

interesting stuff. i pulled my first full-out all-nighter last night. *groan*

Grey Man
12-10-2005, 08:03 AM
Dang, so I cant exercise or study before i go to sleep?

My routine (pathetic)

hit the books and take notes for 40 minutes at 40 minutes timer goes off I do 30 pushups and 60 situps. max time of 3 minutes. Back to books, then repeat except 60 pushups and 30 situps, I do that roughly 3 times a day.

It keeps the grades up and me in shape. I try to run as well but with -5 weather outside :( it is kinda tough . So if my mind is always studying in my room then I wont sleep to the fullest?

Great Articles.

French Cat
12-10-2005, 10:11 AM
Dang, so I cant exercise or study before i go to sleep?

as for everything, every person is unique: just try and you will see if you should or shouldn't


My routine (pathetic)

hit the books and take notes for 40 minutes at 40 minutes timer goes off I do 30 pushups and 60 situps. max time of 3 minutes. Back to books, then repeat except 60 pushups and 30 situps, I do that roughly 3 times a day.

my routine: I wake up, then I take a shower, then I eat.

-I haven't ran or done physical exercises since more than 6 months... way more pathetic than you, I think :p ;)



It keeps the grades up and me in shape. I try to run as well but with -5 weather outside :( it is kinda tough .

cover the top of your body and wear a hat: a muscle produce 80% of heat for 20% of efficient energy when you use it for doing sport, as long as the top of your body is covered you can run by wearing shorts when it's -5 or even -15 outside, believe me ;) (70% of the heat escapes fom the head, don't forget the hat)

the harder will be to bear the first 30 minutes, the time your body become hotter


So if my mind is always studying in my room then I wont sleep to the fullest?

listening calm music can help, having a cold bath can help... try it, you'll see what fits you the most

alabaster
12-10-2005, 04:39 PM
Excellent point. This is also one of the "Body for Life" principles from Bill Phillip's book.


Thanks Michael. I knew I had read that somewhere, just couldn't remember where.

michael
12-11-2005, 05:50 PM
You're welcome. It's really an excellent book. I loaned mine out to someone (I've forgotten who), and haven't seen it since.:(

jest
12-12-2005, 03:37 PM
Recent body works (outside magazine) question regarding when to work out: http://outside.away.com/outside/bodywork/carmichael-20051101.html